04
Sep
08

So Little Info Written Of J.B. Fonoti Out Of Six Samoa History Books

From Book: The Evolution of International Human Rights; by Paul Gordon Lauren. (Page 176)

Thus, the Atlantic Charter, the Declaration of the United Nations, the many speeches by Allied leaders, and even the Declaration on Liberated Europe emerging as late as February 1945 from the Yalta Conference between the United States, Britain, and the Soviet Union all fostered this belief. But there was something more as well. The war produced millions of new European victims of aggression at the hands of the Axis powers. As a result, their own first-hand experience made them much more sympathetic than ever to the sufferings of others forced to live under conquest and subjugation, including those indigenous people within their colonial empires, who vowed that there could never be lasting peace as long as they were denied their freedom. Thus, many victims in the west began to join with many others like Gandhi in India, Ho Chi Minh of Indochina, Nkrumah and Kenyatta of Africa, Carlos Romulo of the Philippines, and Fonoti of Western Samoa in regarding the right of self-determination as absolutely necessary for international peace.

Book “MAU” by Michael Field, Page 56:

In August 1920. a new draft of Chinese labourers arrived o Haldis. They were recruited in Hong Kong, but so that they could travel as “free” citizens, they were not signed up until they reached Apia. Holland claimed they were the “sweeping of the Hong Kong and Shanghai goals”

While the shipment eased one problem, prohibition and the constitution order were causing discontent. A leading chief of Faleapuna, Fonoti, stood before Tate, publicly accused him of “overbearing rule” and said Samoa wanted to be no part of New Zealand. When the administration increased import duties on goods, it was the Samoans who had to pay the higher prices. This led to a sa. On traders throughout ‘Upolu in an attempt to cut back on the revenues the administration would collect. A deputation of Faipules visited Tate to protest at the duty, but when they asked him what he was going to do about it, he replied that New Zealand had many small islands: a reference to Lauaki’s fate.

Book “The Making Of Modern Samoa” by Malama Meleisea, Page 180:

The greatest opposition to approaching independence came from classificatory Europeans who feared a weakening of the economy, a reduction of their personal status, and diminished opportunities to settle in New Zealand. But ‘afakasi’ were by no means united on the issue and indeed, because of the class differences among them, did not join forces politically when the first elections were held for the Legislative Assembly. Under the Samoan Amendment Act of march 1948, the European community was entitled to elect five representatives. Two local European parties, the Labour Party, and the United Citizens party, each put put up five candidates in the first election. Labour took one seat and the United Citizens took four. One of the principal disagreements between them was over the question of self-government. Labour was in favor but asked for the situation of the poor local Europeans of Apia to be a major consideration in government policy. Their leader, Amando Stowers, was of this class himself. The United Citizens espoused a cautious and gradualist approach. Among their leaders was A.G. Smyth, who had considerably modified his position from the days in which he was one of the leading white activists in the MAU. On the Samoan side of the Assembly, Tofa Tomasi (Thomas George Nauer) and Fonoti Ioane (John Brown) and other former local Europeans were in favour of early self-government.

Book “O Tama A Aiga” by A. Morgan Tuimaleali’ifanoa, Page23:

Dispute Between the heirs of Faasuamaleaui and of Silupevailei in 1939.
When Faasuamaleaui’s descendants gathered to deliberate on a successor, Silupevailei’s descendants lodged a formal claim to the title with the court. However, in 1939, before the two sides could meet, Faasuamaleaui’s descendants conferred the title on Fonoti Ioane Brown. Silupevailei’s descendants retaliated by installing Fiame Faumuina Mulinuu I. The dispute was brought to the court, which ruled in favour on Mulinu’u I of the Silupevailei line.

The decision was significant because it departed from the principle of prioritizing the senior line and the heirs of the first born. Why was the title allowed to move from one line to one that had never held it before? The answer may lie in Mulinuu’s important connections, experience and age, marriage, personal qualities and ability to bridge the pre-colonial and colonial worlds.

Mulinuu held two other high-ranking alii titles, Fiame, from Lotofaga, and faumuina, from lepea. He also made an important dynastic marriage by marrying into Sa malietoa. His wife faamusami was a daughter of Malietoa Laupepa.

Fonoti is a senior family title held by members from the Salanoa Muliufi line in Falefa. The exact connection of Fonoti Ioane to Mata’afa title is uncertain. In the mid-1940’s he was the leader of fono of faipule and a leading merchant, farmer and planter. See J.W. Davidson 1966: 110 & 115

Book “Samoa Mo Samoa”.

Book “Samoa mo Samoa” by Professor J.W. Davidson, is the only history book with some decent amount of information written in 15 pages of the book about J.B. Fonoti’s Political and personal history.  To access these pages for your information, please click on the following: SamoamoSamoa

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Comments On Activeboard.com Url: http://www.activeboard.com/forum.spark?forumID=42976&p=1

Name: ‘Ele’ele Date: 4 days ago Views: 122

Colonialists came & bumped up certain titles whose holders were puppets who advanced colonialists interests. Fonoti, descendant of King Fonoti, was more interested in self-determination by Samoans. Davidson & some of earlier posts refer to a leader who has yet to be acknowledged. He fought for the scholarships scheme which enabled our abled Samoans to study overseas & who in turn returned to now lead our country. Do I see any relatives of Fonoti seeking prominence? No! But I owe my tertiary education to his vision! He is a descendant of the last Tafaifa of Samoa. Yet Fonoti did not let his paramouncy got the better of him. He did not grease up to colonialists. He used his wealth & prominence to pressure NZ colonialists in providing opportunities for higher learning for Samoans. So how about these so called higher title holders doing something similar for Samoans?

Name: tamasamoamoni Date: 2 days ago Views: 72

O tama aiga o mea mai anamua, ua leva ona iai tama aiga ae e lei oo atu ni siamani. Usu Tuiatua Tuiaana Muagututia ia Tauamaatu faaee le gafa o Lagi(teine) ma Fepulea’i(tama). Toe usu Tuiatua Tuiaana Muagututia ia Fenunuivao, e leai se la fanau. Ona aumai ai lea o Fuiavailili e fai ma atalii o Muagututia. O le mavaega a Muagututia e faapea, Ole a alu lo’u atalii o Fepuleai i Mulifusi e moto iai le ava a le aiga SA TUALA; A O FUIAVAILILI, OLE A FAAEE IAI PAPA OLE TUIATUA, TUIAANA. Ole tupua lena a Muagututia, maua ai le suafa o TUPUA, aua fai mai nisi ole atalii mo’i o Muagututia ia Fuiavailili. Ona ita le o TUMUA ma fesili; O AI LEA TAMA? O I FEA E SAU AI? O AI ONA AIGA? A O IFEA SONA NUU? Ona fai lea ole SAESAEGALAUFA’I A TUMUA, MA LE FETUATUANAIGA I MALAE. ONA TALA LEA OLE GAFA A LE TAMA O FUIAVAILILI. E TUA MULINUU I FALENUUTUPU, TATALA LE LAFO O MANUO. E TUA VAINIU I ALEIPATALEMELE, TATALA LE LAFO O MOLIOO. E TUA VAIEE I NOFOPULE, TATALA LE LAFO O IULI. E TUA VAILIILI I LALOAOA, TATALA LE LAFO O MOEONOONO. TOE TUA VAILIILI I SALANI MA OLOFESULA, TATALA LE LAFO O TOFUA’IOFOIA. TUA O SALANI MA OLOFESULA I FALEFASA, TATALA LE LAFO O TALOLEMAAGAO. TOE TUA O FALEFASA I FALENIU MA FALETOI I SALUAFATA, TATALA LE LAFO O FAAUTAGIA. ONA FAAPEA LEA O TUMUA, FAAEE PAPA ILE TAMA LEA, AUA OLE TAMA E TELE ONA AIGA. MAUA AI LE FAALAGIGA, TAMA A AIGA, MA LE ULUA’I TUPUA, AUA OLE TUPUA LENA A MUAGUTUTIA E LE’I MATEINA E TAGATA. MA E MONI LAVA, O LE TAGATA PITO I SILI ONA TIGAINA ILE TAUMAFAIGA INA IA TU TO’ATASI SAMOA MA SAOLOTO, O J. B. FONOTI, OLE TAITAI OLE FONO A FAIPULE. O IA LEA SA FAIA LE GALUEGA TAUA OLE SAILIGA O LE TU TOATASI MAI LE FAALAPOTOPOTOGA O MALO ESEESE (UNITED NATIONS). O IA FOI LEA SA FESOOTAI MA LE PALEMIA O FRASER I NA ONA PO. AE TALOFA E, UA GALO O IA, MA TANU I LALO ANA GALUEGA FITA MA LE FAIGATA, AE EA MA I LUGA LE AU ALII IA E AVE MO LATOU LE VIIGA MA LE MAMALU NA IAI. UA SUIA FOI E LATOU LE TALAFAASOLOPITO (HISTORY) I NA ONA PO. O LOO SOIFUA LE ATUA. E MUAMUA LE FAATUATUA OLE TAGATA, SOSOO AI MA ANA GALUEGA, PE LELEI, PE LEAGA, E MULIMULI ATU LAVA I ONA TUA. SAMOA E, E LE A’OAIA E MATAPIA LE MANAIA, AUA O OE OLE AULI MA LE PAE OLE ALA TANU. SOIFUA


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