Posts Tagged ‘[5] SAMOA HISTORY

04
Jan
09

THE SEVEN CHIEFS OF A’ANA AS LA’AU NA FAUSIA.

THE SEVEN CHIEFS OF A’ANA AS LA’AUNAFAUSIA AS FOLLOWS:
1: AFAMASAGA,
2: AIONO,
3: MISA,
4: TANUVASA,
5: VAILI,
6: LUATUANU’U,
7: FINAU.

FA’ALUPEGA O FASITO’OTAI:

- Tulouna a oe Tutuila, (the faleupolu, tulafale Tutuila)
– Tulouna a oe le falefitu (Seven Orator Chiefs, who govern the affairs, namely:
Tuiatua, Taua’i, Mo’a, So’ona’ai, Aigaga, Niumanumanu and Inu. In contrast to them is
The House of The Chiefs, called Aiga La’aufausia, consisting of: Afamasaga, Aiono,
Misa, Tanuvasa, Vaili, Luatuanu’u and Finau who deliberate about war -
Aiga Taulagi).
– Tulouna oulua na ta’i, (Fasito’outa and Fasito’otai: na ta’i i alataua o Leulumoega)
– Tulouna a le aiga Taulagi, (Aiga Tuia’ana)
– Tulouna le matua Va’afusuaga ma Tole’afoa, (i Satui)
– ma le matua usoali’i Afamasaga, (oldest fraternal ‘brotherly’ chief Afamasaga)
– Tulouna lau afioga Tuigamala o le ma’upu o Tuia’ana, (Tuia’ana’s high house lives in Vailu’utai)
– Afio mai Lealaisalanoa (i Falefa).
_ _

FA’ALUPEGA O FASITO’OUTA: (All further information about names etc., under Fasito’otai)

- Tulouna oe Ape, (the faleupolu)
– Tulouna oulua na ta’i, (na ta’i tao i le faleupolu o Leulumoega)
– Tulouna o le falefitu, (Seven Orators Chiefs as in Fasito’otai: Ape, Faletutulu,
Tua’au’toto’a, Pa’o, Muliaumaseali’i, Auola and Feaunati)
Tulouna le aiga Satuala, (Aiga a le Aiga Tuia’ana; mai Faleasi’u, Satapuala, Lefaga,
Savai’i i Lealatele ma Amoa)
– Susu mai lau susuga Aiono, (Satuala i Matailiili)
– Afio mai lau afioga Aupepe, (Satuala i Satui)
– Tulouna lau afioga Tole’afoa, o le Tapa’au fa’asisina, (i Satui as in Fasito’otai)
– Susu mai lau susuga a Su’a. (Su’a family in Savai’i)

_ _

27
Dec
08

ORIGINAL COPIES OF MINUTES FOR PETITION ON SELF-GOVERNMENT IN 1944 BY HON FONOTI WAS DIRECTLY PRESENTED TO NZ PM RT. HON P. FRASER, ETC.

HON FONOTI MATA’UTIA IOANE BROWN was a successful Samoan businessman and also a successful politition. He was the leader of ‘The Fono a Faipule’ of Samoa from 1939 to 1947. And was also a ‘Member of the Legislative Assembly’ from 1948 to 1952 and 1955 to 1957. And from 1954 he was also a member of the ‘Working Committee of the Constitutional Convention of the Government of Samoa. He was also the leader for the MAU of Atua from 1935 to Vaimoso as last in 1942. The founder and leader of Samoa Democratic Party in 1953.

THE PETITION FOR SELF-GOVERNMENT IN SAMOA BY LEADER FAIPULE HON FONOTI IN 1944, AND THE UNITED NATIONS APPROVAL ON THE 13th DECEMBER 1946. THE NEWLY SAMOAN FLAG WAS RAISED ON 1st JUNE 1948: SAMOA’S FREEDOM! HON FONOTI GOVERNMENT APPOINTED OF HIS WISH IN 1954-57.

THE PETITION FOR SELF-GOVERNMENT IN SAMOA BY HON FONOTI MATA’UTIA IOANE BROWN THAT PRESENTED DIRECTLY TO NEW ZEALAND GOVERNOR-GENERAL SIR. CYRAL NEWALL IN JUNE 1944, AND MUCH MORE DIRECTLY TO NEW ZEALAND PRIME MINISTER THE RT. HON MR PETER FRASER IN DECEMBER 1944: ORIGINAL COPIES OF MINUTES TAKEN ON DECEMBER 20TH to 26TH IN 1944.

There was, then, in Western Samoa from 1942 onwards a growing and audible demand for self-government, a demand by no means silenced by New Zealand paternalism. In 1944 that which had long been familiar to experts was made explicit. In June of that year the Governor-General, Sir Cyril Newall, paid his third visit to the territory, and Samoan spokesman, while welcoming him on behalf of the Fono of Faipule, expressed solid criticism of New Zealand policy. “The Samoans, said leader Hon Fonoti, had been denied even that element of self-government which had been established in Tonga and Fiji and in Eastern Samoa. The terms of the mandate have imposed on New Zealand the solemn duty of educating the Samoans to self-government and the terms of the Atlantic Charter express the same aim for the small nations of the world. Thirty years have passed since New Zealand took over Western Samoa and we are appreciably no nearer this goal. We wish to assure your Excellency that the Samoan people are loyal to the Union Jack, His Majesty the King and the British Empire, but after thirty years of New Zealand administration during which our justified aspirations were ignored and our requests for improvements were rejected, we have lost confidence in the trusteeship of New Zealand which has shown a lack of interest in the territory and treated its people as stepchildren. In the Governor’s phrase, – a nettle is appearing”.

In the month that followed, political activity continued, and the Faipule leader Hon Fonoti formed a standing committee to keep in touch with the workings of the administration: move with sinister precedents. In the view of an experienced observer; it was not far removed from the formation of another Mau. By this time, however, it was known that the Prime Minister himself was about to visit the mandated territory. He was known to have a keen personal interest in its administration, of which since 1940 he had been the ministerial head; but the tremendous pressure of war issues during the ensuing years had kept his main attention elsewhere.

In 1944, as the war situation eased and as politics in Western Samoa grew more tense, he carried out a long-deferred intention to discuss the matter on the spot with those most concerned. This visit of the Prime Minister Peter Fraser to Western Samoa and his discussions with a special Fono in December “proved a Crucial Event in New Zealand’s Relations with the Samoans and in the Evolution of New Zealand’s conception of trusteeship”.

In the first place, the Samoans formulated their political demands for themselves, as well as for the New Zealand Government, with unmistakable clarity. The Faipule leader Hon Fonoti presented to the Prime Minister a list of remits, most of which were detailed and aimed at progressive displacement of Europeans by Samoans in administration, but which was headed by a firm request for self-government after the war.

(Note: just for the first page 158 is from book Samoa mo Samoa by Professor J.W. Davidson)

SAMOA MO SAMOA BOOK BY PROFESSOR J.W. DAVIDSON P158COPIES MINUTES OF PETITON FOR SELF-GOVERNMENT BY HON FONOTI IN DECEMBER 1944

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THE LIST OF REMITS INCLUDED TO THE PETITION FOR SELF-GOVERNMENT IN SAMOA BY HON FONOTI MATA’UTIA IOANE BROWN TO NZ PM HON MR FRASER IN 1944

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COPIES OF THE UNITED NATIONS APPROVAL FOR SELF-GOVERNMENT IN SAMOA ON DECEMBER 13TH 1946: A RESULT FROM THE PETITION FOR SELF-GOVERNMENT BY HON FONOTI ON DECEMBER 20TH 1944.

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HON FONOTI OF WESTERN SAMOA RATED SAME LEVEL AMONGST SOME OF THE GREATEST PEOPLE IN THE WORLD LIKE GANDHI IN INDIA AND FOUR OTHERS FOR WORLD PEACE AND FREEDOM 1945

From Book: The Evolution of International Human Rights; visions seen; by Paul Gordon Lauren. Edition 2. (Page 176: Chapter 6) Peace And A Charter With Human Rights.

Book Intro: Paul Lauren makes clear the truly universal nature of this movement by drawing into his discussion people and cultures in every part of the globe. Paul Gordon Lauren is the first person to be named as a Regents Professor at The University of Montana. He is an internationally-recognized teacher and scholar on diplomacy, international relations, and human rights. In this regard, the book offers particularly remarkable revelations and insights when analyzing the impact of wars and revolutions, non-Western nations, struggles against sexism and racism, liberation movements and decolonization, nongovernmental organizations, and the courage and determination of countless numbers of common men and women who have contributed to the evolution of international human rights. This new edition incorporates the most recent developments of the International Criminal Court, the arrest of Augusto Pinochet and the trial of Slobodan Milosevic, technology and the Internet, the impact of NGOs like Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch, globalization, terrorism, and the aftermath of the September 11 terrorist attacks. Professor Lauren has presented many lectures throughout the United States and around the world to a wide variety of audiences, including students and professors, the general public, activists, analysts, attorneys and judges, professional diplomats, legislators, and policy makers. He also has delivered invited addresses before the Smithsonian Institution, the Nobel Peace Institute, and the United Nations.

Leader Hon Fonoti of Western Samoa Global Recognition For World Peace And Freedom 1945.

Peace, in their mind, thus required that “all human beings, irrespective of race, creed, or sex, have the right to persue both their material well-being and their spiritual development in conditions of freedom and dignity, of economic security, and equal opportunity.

Many also began to define peace as more clearly entailing the protection of civil and political rights for all people. After their own recent history, they will no longer willing to accept the old proposition that how a government treated its own people remained an exclusive and simple matter of “domestic jurisdiction.” The crushing of all opposition, the denial of freedom of speech and assembly, the elimination of due process, and the expansion of the power of the state over the lives of individuals and groups by Hitler, Mussolini, and the militarists in Japan – all behind the protective shield of national sovereignty – convinced them that the abuse of rights at home could all too quickly spill over national borders and lead to war and even genocide. “As basic human rights are protected in each country, the prevention of war is made easier,” declared the Commission to Study the Organisation of Peace. The reason for this, they believed, could be stated directly and in light of recent experience:

Now, as a result of the Second World War, it has become clear that a regime of violence and oppression within any nation of the civilized world is a matter of concern for all the rest. It is a disease in the body politic which is contagious because the government that rest upon violence will, by its very nature, be even more ready to do violence to foreigners than to its own fellow citizens, especially if it can thus escape the consequences of its acts at home. The foreign policy of despots is inherently one which carries with it a constant risk to the peace and security of others. In short, if aggression is the key-note of domestic policy, it will also be the clue to foreign relations.

The ordeal of this particular war similarly contributed to the concept that any lasting peace would require an implementation of the right of self-determination. Part of this, of course, resulted from the many promises made by the Allies to distance themselves from their adversaries and to solicit support for the larger crusade. They promoted the idea at every opportunity that the right of all people to choose the form of government under which they would live remained one of the most essential ingredients of any peace settlement.Thus, the Atlantic Charter, the Declaration of the United Nations, the many speeches by Allied leaders, and even the Declaration on Liberated Europe emerging as late as February 1945 from the Yalta Conference between the United States, Britain, and the Soviet Union all fostered this belief. But there was something more as well. The war produced millions of new European victims of aggression at the hands of the Axis powers. As a result, their own first-hand experience made them much more sympathetic than ever to the sufferings of others forced to live under conquest and subjugation, including those indigenous people within their colonial empires, who vowed that there could never be lasting peace as long as they were denied their freedom. Thus, many victims in the west began to join with many others like Gandhi in India, Ho Chi Minh of Indochina, Nkrumah and Kenyatta of Africa, Carlos Romulo of the Philippines, and Fonoti of Western Samoa in regarding the right of self-determination as absolutely necessary for international peace.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights: on Page 207
Simultaneous with these intense debates on the new human rights agenda were those that raged over the right of self-determination. World War II had released powerful psychological and political forces in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Middle East, and the Pacific demanding rights for indigenous peoples and an end to colonial empires. These clashed directly and often violently with the resistance of the imperial powers to surrender control over their possessions. Simultaneous with these intense debates on the new human rights agenda were those that raged over the right of self-determination. World War II had released powerful psychological and political forces in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Middle East, and the Pacific demanding rights for indigenous peoples and an end to colonial empires. These clashed directly and often violently with the resistance of the imperial powers to surrender control over their possessions.

Considerable pressure had been bought to bear by the majority of states to write provisions into the Charter concerning the Declaration Regarding Non-Self-Governing Territories, recognizing the principle that the interests of the inhabitants of these lands were paramount and pledging to work toward self-government and to authorize the creation of an International Trusteeship system within the United Nations. But this represented only a tenuous compromise. The majority within the General Assembly, who themselves had once been victims of imperialism, still were not satisfied, and decided to push further. Instead of having only imperial powers serve on the Trusteeship Council, for example, they elected such well-known vocal opponents of colonialism as China, Iraq, Mexico, and the Soviet Union. They battled over the text of each and every trusteeship agreement, trying to drive the specific conditions toward a greater emphasis on the rights of the peoples of these territories. In this regard, they strongly criticized a number of the early draft proposals from the colonial powers, but praised the commitment from the New Zealand that its agreement with Western Samoa would be “in effect a self-contained Bill of Rights for the inhabitants.

They adamantly rejected the plan by South Africa to annex South-West Africa and passed two important resolutions. One of these sought to take reports about the conditions within the trust territories and place them in the hands of the General Assembly as a whole where they could be discussed by determined and vocal advocates of decolonization. A second resolution called on those members who administered trust territories to convene special conferences of representatives of the peoples living in these lands in order that they might articulate their wishes and aspirations for self-government. Such action, they declared, would help to give practical effect to both the letter and the spirit of the human rights provisions within the Charter itself.

Paul Gordon Lauren, Ph.D. Biography:
Paul Gordon Lauren is the first person to be named as a Regents Professor at The University of Montana. He is an internationally-recognized teacher and scholar on diplomacy, international relations, and human rights. He has published many articles, chapters, and eleven books, all or portions of which have been translated into seven different languages, including the widely-read Force and Statecraft, the highly-acclaimed The Evolution of International Human Rights: Visions Seen nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, and the award-winning Power and Prejudice: The Politics and Diplomacy of Racial Discrimination. Professor Lauren has received the Distinguished Scholar Award, Outstanding Advisor to Students Award, the Most Inspirational Teacher Award, the Robert Pantzer Award, and the Award for Distinguished Service to International Education at The University of Montana as well as the CASE Professor of the Year Award and the Governor’s Humanities Award. He served as the founding director of the Maureen and Mike Mansfield Center and as the Mansfield Professor of Ethics and Public Affairs. In addition, he has been a Senior Fulbright Scholar, a Senior Fulbright Specialist, a Woodrow Wilson Fellow, a Peace Fellow, a Rockefeller Foundation Humanities Fellow, and a Distinguished Lecturer for the U.S. Department of State. Professor Lauren has presented many lectures throughout the United States and around the world to a wide variety of audiences, including students and professors, the general public, activists, analysts, attorneys and judges, professional diplomats, legislators, and policy makers. He also has delivered invited addresses before the Smithsonian Institution, the Nobel Peace Institute, and the United Nations.
More details on the book:
The evolution of international human rights: visions seen
By Paul Gordon Lauren
Edition: 2, illustrated
Published by University of Pennsylvania Press, 2003
ISBN 081221854X, 9780812218541
397 pages. – (Copy Page 176 from book below)

HUMAN RIGHTS: BY REGENTS PROFESSOR PAUL GORDAN LAUREN

From Book: Samoa mo Samoa; by Professor J.W. Davidson.
At the beginning of June two major events gave further evidence of the growing reality of the new political era. On 1st of June 1948 the newly authorized flags of Samoa-the Samoan flag (which had just been adopted) and the New Zealand flag, flown conjointly, were raised ceremonially for the first time. An official anthem, ‘The Banner of Freedom’, had been composed for the occasion. In the wave of sympathetic emotion which the occasion generated the country gained a national flag, a national anthem and a national day, all of which established a hold on the people’s minds and survived as part of the ceremonial superstructure of the nation state that they were engaged in creating. The next day the High Commissioner opened the first session of the Legislative Assembly.  (This info stated from the two pages below P191 and P192 of the book: Samoa mo Samoa by professor J.W. Davidson)

SAMOA MO SAMOA BOOK BY PROFESSOR J.W. DAVIDSONSAMOA MO SAMOA BOOK BY PROFESSOR J.W. DAVIDSON P192

SOURCE: NZTEC; The New Zealand Electronic Text Centre. Digital library to significant New Zealand and Pacific Island texts and materials.Victoria University Of Wellington.
REPORTS:
1. Twenty-second Report of the Administration of the Mandated Territory of Western Samoa, Wellington, N.Z., 1945.
2. Report to the Trusteeship Council by the United Nations Mission to Western Samoa, 1947.

NZTEC Text: CONCLUSION TO CONSTITUTIONAL CHANGES:
Constitutional changes of great importance have taken place in Western Samoa since the introduction went through the press early in 1947, and it is now necessary to add something to what was stated in the latter part of that chapter in order to record the more significant developments that have succeeded the Mandate.

The draft Trusteeship Agreement for Western Samoa submitted to the United Nations by the New Zealand Government was placed before the General Assembly of that body for consideration and approval in October, 1946. Approval accorded on 13th December, 1946, brought Western Samoa under the International Trusteeship system.

In the meantime, however, the Samoan people, consulted regarding the terms of the draft agreement, had submitted a petition praying for immediate self-government under the protection of New Zealand. This the New Zealand Government duly forwarded to the Trusteeship Council with a request that a United Nations Mission should visit Western Samoa to investigate the petition. The Mission arrived on 4th July and left on 28th August, 1947, its complete report being released in October of the same year.

The Government’s proposals relating to constitutional changes in Western Samoa were outlined in the House of Representatives by the Acting Prime Minister on 27th August, 1947, and were later found to differ in very few particulars from the recommendations set out in the report of the Mission.

An Act of the General Assembly of New Zealand giving affect to the Government’s proposals was passed in November, 1947, and brought into force on the 10th March, 1948, by Governor-General’s Proclamation.

The significant provisions of that Act are as follows:
(1) The Administrator is in future to be known as the High Commissioner.
(2) A Council of State is established consisting of the High Commissioner and the Samoan leaders for the time being holding office as Fautua. The High Commissioner is to consult the Council of State on all proposals for legislation, matters closely relating to Samoan custom and any other matters affecting the welfare of Western Samoa which he considers it proper to refer to the Council of State.
(3) The old Legislative Council is abolished and a new legislature termed the Legislative Assembly, over which the High Commissioner or his nominee presides, is constituted consisting of:
(a) The Samoan members for the time being of the Council of State:
(b) Eleven Samoan members nominated by the Fono of Faipule:
(c) Not more than five European elected members:
(d) Not more than six official members, of whom three are nominated by the Governor- General and three by the High Commissioner.

There is thus an effective Samoan majority in the new legislature, whose powers are wide, but do not extend to the making of laws relating to defence (except in regard to the taking of land for defence purposes), external affairs, or affecting the title to Crown lands. The Assembly is not competent to make any Ordinance repugnant to the provisions of any enactments declared in or pursuant to the Samoa Amendment Act, 1947, to be reserved.

On Tuesday, 1st June, 1948, in the course of celebrations that lasted the entire week, the new Samoan Flag and the New Zealand Ensign were raised together on the historic Malae at Mulinu’u, and the next morning the Legislative Assembly was formally opened by the High Commissioner. The Council of State has functioned regularly since its inception.

The establishment of the United Nations Organisation has furnished the occasion for the development of a legal substitute for the Mandates system and in terms of the Trusteeship Agreement the New Zealand Government assumes direct responsibility for the administration of the trust Territory. In relation to successive modern political stages and the derivation of New Zealand’s authority in Western Samoa, must therefore be read in conjunction with the note of constitutional changes was set out thus closes with the commencement of a new political era in the lives of the people of Western Samoa.

It has been shown that Samoan society, although tenacious of its own culture in the past, is then subject to stresses that may possibly lead to sweeping social reforms within a comparatively short period. Ignorance can be a country’s greatest enemy, and there are many Samoans who recognize that their progress to ultimate self-government is inevitably bound up with education, particularly that of the younger generation. Progress and education will bring changes in their train, but that moment there is much of beauty and dignity in Samoan custom that links the present with the past.

The aspirations of an intelligent people for self-government may properly command respect and earnest assistance. Although a period of preparation is inevitable, it has been stated on behalf of the New Zealand Government that the steps taken recently are only the first in a process that will not end until the people of Western Samoa are able to assume full responsibility for the control of their own affairs. Link To: NZTEC

FOOTNOTES:
On August, 1947, the term ‘Native’ had been replaced by ‘Samoan’ in normal official usage after the New Zealand policy statement of Aug 1947. The Department of Native Affairs, for example, had been renamed Department of Samoan Affairs. But the term ‘Native’ remained in the text of many legal enactments, in the title of various offices, etc., till the Samoa Amendment Act, 1951, provided for its general replacement by ‘Samoan’. (Davidson Bk: Samoa mo Samoa)

During 1947-54, The growth in export earnings was paralleled by an increase in the participation of Samoan villagers in economic life. Samoan producers had contributed the figure was 1,999 tons of cocoa, or sixty-six per cent of the total exported. A rapidly growing banana trade was very largely reserved to Samoan growers. A great deal more money, this encouraged many Samoans in villages to begin trading on their own account. A return of June 1954 showed nearly seventy Samoans as the holders of business licences, nearly all as general storekeepers. One of these – Hon Fonoti Ioane Brown – who was an Apia merchant, had been the principal founder of the first predominantly Samoan-owned company, Samoa Traders Ltd. – was shown as operating fourteen stores, also became the most successful planters and cattlemen, his career had shown he was a man of drive and considerable shrewdness. His title belonged not to Lufilufi (the political centre of Atua, which he was to represent) but to Lotofaga Atua. (Davidson Bk: Samoa mo Samoa)

On March 10, 1948, the Samoa Amendment Act of 1947 became law. It changed the designation of Western Samoa’s principal executive officer from “Administrator” to “High Commissioner.” The “Administration of Western Samoa” became the “Government of Western Samoa.” (1a. Davidson 1967: 185)

On June 1, 1948, Western Samoa’s new flag was raised ceremonially for the first time, and was flown together with the New Zealand flag in Apia. (1a. Davidson 1967: 191)

On June 2, 1948, the High Commissioner opened the first session of the Legislative Assembly. (Davidson 1967: 190)

On March 1, 1949, Sir Guy Powles, Ph.D., was appointed as New Zealand’s High Commissioner for Western Samoa. (1a. Davidson 1967: 192)

On March 27, 1950, a Commission of Inquiry on Government Reform was appointed in Western Samoa. The members were: Tofa Tomasi, Tuala Tulo, Mata’ia Si’u, Tofilau Siaosi, Fa’amatuainu Tofilau and Namulau’ulu Siaosi. (1a. Davidson 1967: 265)

On April 1, 1950, Western Samoa’s Public Service Commission was created. (1a. Davidson 1960: 212)

HON FONOTI MATA’UTIA IOANE BROWN: THE FOUNDER AND LEADER OF THE SAMOA DEMOCRATIC PARTY 1951/1953

Immediately after the general election of 1951, Hon Fonoti had taken the novel step of calling a public meeting of Samoans to consider the formation of a political party. Out of this action the Samoan Democratic Party emerged. Men as varied in their outlook as Hon Fonoti himself, the practical businessman, in Hon Fonoti’s case, to retain Political Office. During its first year the party claimed a membership of about three hundred and the support of a substantial proportion of the untitled people; after that it gradually declined. But the election of Hon Fonoti to the Fono of Faipule late in 1951 and his return to the Legislative Assembly in 1954 Gave It A Place In The Formal Political Life Of The Country; and others who were associated with it have since served in Public Office. Though it was never able to function effectively as a pressure group, it’s more important policy proposals were brought clearly before the public; even thou the Party died, its Ideals have lived on in the form of demand for Universal Surfrage with Matai Candidacy, the replacement of The Fono a Faipule and The Legislative Assembly by One Body, and Personal Tax Services.  (Text: Samoa mo Samoa Book) And Original Copies As Follows:

HON FONOTI FOUNDER OF SAMOA DEMOCRACTIC PARTY 1953HON FONOTI FOUNDER OF SAMOA DEMOCRACTIC PARTY 1953HON FONOTI FOUNDER OF SAMOA DEMOCRACTIC PARTY 1953

Hon Fonoti the founder and the leader of the Samoa Democratic Party 1951/1953

CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION OF WESTERN SAMOA, 1954:

Hon. Fonoti on pp. 290-291: “Hon. Chairmen and Members of this Convention.

Now is the time when all Christian people throughout the world are waiting to commemorate the birth of our Savious, Jesus Christ, and I should say therefore that Samoa should, together with the Angels in Heaven, at this time sing joyously ‘Goodwill to All Men’ and give praise unto the Lord. I say, therefore, Samoa be courageous and steadfast. This is the thing which was started by our parents who are now passed away, and therefore we should be steadfast and should support what our fathers started. The dignity of this Convention represents the dignity of the people of Samoa throughout the island and we should support and endeavour to carry out what our forefathers started. Samoa is a Christian nation and I do not think that any of us can find a non-Christian in Samoa. I say now before you that if we are not united and if we do not support and trust our leaders I do not think we shall secure what we are striving for. I am really happy indeed to see that we have realised what we have been striving for because who thought that we should come to see this day and to be in the position we are now in? I should therefore like to state before this convention how much I appreciate what our forefathers have done for us and I say ‘praise thee unto the Lord on high’ and pray that Samoa will remain peaceful.

Perhaps I have said enough and now I should like to say what I have in mind not because I’m a member of the Working Committee but because I should like to say that in as far as I am concerned I am wholeheartedly in agreement with all that has been put before us now and on the matter on which I would like to comment first is the question of Suffrage.

I would say to the Members of the Convention, please be calm; we are here to express our opinions and our views and what is good we should accept and what is bad we should reject. I have agreed because I realise the position that we are in and also the wishes of our people. I feel so anxious that we should establish our Self-Government firmly. Considering the progress of our people and in respect of our population and the progress of education in our country, I feel therefore duty-bound to say what is in my mind for the sake of our people and for the sake of our people and good of our future. Taking the position of the matai as it is now in our country today, the number of matai is as has been from the creases and the situation is that instead of the matai position growing it is not growing.

I feel if we realise the importance of Universal Suffrage as it is throughout the world then we shall give consideration to this point because if we allow all people to vote and have a say in the affairs of Government then I feel the position of the matai will be very secure indeed for the future. But if we do not accept such a procedure for the present then as time goes and as knowledge increases and as our children become educated and as our population increases I fear that I shall thoroughly regret that time when it comes.

CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION OF WESTERN SAMOA, 1954:

Hon. Fonoti on p. 369:

“Messrs. Chairmen, in order that the matter be fully clarified I should like to say that the other reason why the Committee arrived at this recommendation was that after the period of three powers there was created here the position of two Fautua. That position has been well kept up to the present and the Samoans have witnessed the peaceful relationship existing in the country. As explained by one member, any frequent changes made will lead to trouble in the country, and I suggest that the position of two Fautua should be quite sufficient in the meantime. Samoa under the two Fautua has been living under peaceful and harmonious conditions.”

LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF SAMOA, DEBATES, AUGUST SESSION 1954:

Hon. Fonoti, pp. 62-63: “Mr. President, Hon. Fautua and Hon. Members of the Assembly.

I was not going to speak on this matter, but since the matter has been discussed in detail and since it has become more serious in the minds of some Hon. Members I would like to contribute my opinion in connection with this matter. The relationship between this Legislative Assembly and the New Zealand Government, which is regarded as our trustee, is well understood in the minds of all Hon. Members of this Assembly and I think it is well understood also by all the people of the Territory. We have strived hard during the past and we are still striving towards that very goal which is dear to our hearts and that is a government to be governed by the people of this territory. We as representatives of the people should bear in mind that the opportunity given to us at this stage should be made use of, and, therefore it is up to us to work peacefully, harmoniously and in a friendly manner so as to enable us to achieve that very goal and we, that side of the House and this side of the House, are charged with the task of working together and co-operating together to reach that very goal. I regret, however, to say that ever since the opening day of this Assembly we have heard adverse comments by Members which to my mind is purely a non co-operative spirit. I would like to stress this point that there is nothing harmful to the progress of Samoa towards its goal.

I would like to refer to Standing Order 166 which is in itself self-explanatory. There is nothing here referring to any of the Executive Council members becoming Chairmen of any Standing Committee of this House. I, therefore, plead with you Hon. Members of the House on that side, the five elected members of the European Community, that I have a good understanding of the qualifications which you have in connection with matters concerning the welfare of our people and I ask you to be good enough and try and impart the knowledge you have so as to familiarise your brothers on this side in matters concerning the welfare of this country, and at the same time I pray that you will work together with us on this side towards that common aim.

Hon. Members of this House I again stress this point that it is no use saying that you have the interest of the Samoan people at heart when you are acting against it. Therefore, let us remember that if we are to row our boat to safety we must pull together and not as each rower pleases as nothing good can be gained by the Samoan government by so doing. I wish to repeat myself Sir, that I would like to see all members of representatives of the people who are present in this House working together for the common cause of our people.

I would like also to mention that we have before the House an amendment moved by one Hon. Member to the effect that ex-officio members of the Executive Council should not be allowed to vote or move any amendment in the various Standing Committees, and, if that is the attitude taken in this House as expressed by amendment moved by that Hon. Member we can never work ourselves in peace and in harmony.

In conclusion, I would say this that you and all of us here are representatives of the people and if we have the interest of our country at heart then we must try and work and pull together in order to gain what we hold dear in our hearts. The problem which we are facing now is, I think in the minds of one and all – the future self-governing State of Samoa.

FOOTNOTES:
On April 1, 1954, the “District and Village Government Board Ordinance” became law in Western Samoa. (1a. Davidson 1967: 312)

On December 22, 1954, Western Samoa’s Constitutional Convention concluded its proceedings. (1a. Davidson 1967: 324)

In 1954-1960, The Working Committee had been able to reach solutions on the most difficult problems of Samoan politics. In reaching decisions that were both clear and comprehensive on subjects such as the Head of State and domestic status, in its various aspects, the Working Committee Constitutional Convention had provided a firm foundation for the government of the future Samoan state. The drafting of the Constitution more important was the question of choosing a term to describe the new state. ‘Kingdom’ or ‘elective monarchy’, which would have accorded with Samoan sentiment, were inappropriate; and ‘republic’, which would have been accurate, were wholly unacceptable. Other terms that were thought of, such as ‘principality’, were rejected for one reason or another. The final decision, therefore, was in favour of the term ‘Independent State of Western Samoa’. (Davidson Bk: Samoa mo Samoa)

On October 28, 1960, Western Samoa’s Constitutional Convention completed its work. (1a. Davidson 1967: 400-401)

HON FONOTI MATA’UTIA IOANE BROWN: LEADER OF FONO OF FAIPULE OF SAMOA FROM 1939 TO 1947: MEMBER OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY FROM 1948 TO 1952 & 1955 TO 1957: MEMBER OF THE CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION GOVT. SAMOA IN 1954: LEADER OF THE MAU FOR ATUA FROM 1935 TO 1942.

fonoti-info-from-govt-samoa2HON FONOTI MATA’UTIA IOANE BROWN GOVERNMENT APPOINTMENTS OF HIS WISH FOR SAMOA IN 1954 – 1957: SAMOA INDEPENDENCE: ORIGINAL COPIES OF MINUTES TAKEN.

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THE LEADER OF SAMOA: O TOFIGA O LE MALO MA LE MAVAEGA O HON FONOTI MATA’UTIA IOANE BROWN: HON FONOTI MATA’UTIA JOHN BROWN GOVERNMENT APPOINTMENTS OF HIS WISH FOR THE OFFICIAL CONSTITUTIONAL GOVERNMENT OF SAMOA IN 1954-57

HON FONOTI: Hon Acting Chairmen and the dignity of the Convention.

SAMOA, I would say that even though this Convention has been somewhat long, it is now seven weeks since it started, but it is not a thing that we should be downhearted about, and from what I have heard of the expression of options I am convinced that the majority of us here are very keen indeed to secure Self Government – SAMOA INDEPENDENCE!

I AGREE that this Constitutional Convention is something like religious conference because we have very often mentioned the Name of God, whereas this Convention is the Constitutional Convention of the Government of Samoa. I feel that the reason why perhaps we are mentioning the name of God so very often is because we are anxious that A Government of Samoa be Founded in God, AND I WISH TO SAY THEREFORE TO YOU SAMOA WELL DONE INDEED.

I AM CONVINCED THAT SAMOA is very anxious to take over the reins of her Own Government and Regain her rights to take charge of her own affairs. I would appeal to you Samoa, do not worry. Why should we worry? We are present here, we are all Samoans and this is Samoa which is holding this Convention. I would drew your attention Samoa to the fact that we are a Christian Country and this week we will again commemorate the Birth of Christ, the King of Peace on Earth. I would say, therefore, that we should all rejoice and be happy and sing together the ancient hymn ‘Praise be to God on High, Peace and Goodwill unto Men’. Therefore, I would say let us not worry. I am convinced that our people of Samoan are Christians, and where there is right according to the Will of God, there will be success. I would say, therefore, to you to bear in mind that Samoa is a Christian people and as Christians we should certainly exercise, faith, hope and love.

By Faith I mean we should believe there is a God; by Hope I would say that we should meet the temptations of the devil with hope in God; and by Love I mean that we should have that love whereby we will reject all that is bad and all that is not right that we may do, as good Christian people to love God and love our people and do that which is right. Samoa, let us be bound together in that love which should bring us together and do what is right for the benefit of our country in future.

Now I will express my opinion on this question of HEAD OF STATE. Before I actually state what I have in mind I should first like to remind this Convention that I am one of the members of the Working Committee, and our recommendation of course is before you now; but Since listening to the expressions which have been made in this Convention since the time we started I have come to some conclusions and formed my own opinion which I now wish to express before you.

FIRST, I would say that the present Council of State be retained and that its name be changed to Fono of Ta’imua – Council of Leaders.

SECOND, That the four royal sons of Samoa be in that Council.

THIRD, that the Hon Tupua Tamasese and Hon Malietoa, as they are at present, the Head of State, But for the future that there be only ONE Head of State and that the Head of the State be selected from within that fono of Ta’imua, And that the four nominates the Head of the State. If they are unable to do that then the matter should be referred to the Legislature for final action.

THOSE ARE MY WISHES to this question of Head of the State and I would say if we should do that and carry hope, faith and charity in our hearts, and trust in our Lord, and trust in our own people, I am sure we will succeed and be bound together in Unity and Friendship. And I would say not only for the present, but also for the future, so that the very words written in our flag which is flying above us now “GOD IS THE FOUNDATION OF SAMOA” may be always in our hearts. I have many other points which I would have liked to speak about but time is short.

Sir, I move that the Steering Committee comprising 5 Samoans and 2 Europeans namely:
Hon Leutele Te’o, Hon Tualaulelei, Hon Gatoloai Peseta, Hon To’omata and Hon Va’ai Kolone, Hon H.W. Moors and Hon A.M. Gurau, be Confirmed.
Hon Fiame Mata’afa Faumuina Mulinuu (ii) as the first Prime Minister of the Government of Samoa – Hon Fonoti Ioane Brown called a special meeting with his district and family of Aiga Pa’ia o Sa-Levalasi at Lotofaga Atua, to confirmed his retirement as a Politician at the end of 1957, and offer the opportunity to Fiame Mata’afa Faumuina Mulinu’u (ii).

Hon Fonoti Mata'utia Ioane Brown 1954-1957.

HON FONOTI MATA’UTIA IOANE BROWN ON SOME OF HIS GOVERNMENT TRIPS TO NEW ZEALAND IN THE 1940’s to 1950’s

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HON FONOTI MATA’UTIA IOANE BROWN HIGH COURT APPROVAL HE REQUESTED TO ABOLISHED  HIS PART EUROPEAN SIDE (BROWN FAMILY) TO BE LEGALLY A TRUE TOTAL SAMOAN.

fonoti-i-le-faamasinoga-sili-o-samoa-i-sisifo1HON FONOTI MATA’UTIA IOANE BROWN. PICTURED IN YEAR 1955

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POLITICAL REFERENCE: Hon Fonoti Mata’utia Ioane Brown of Lalovaea and Lotofaga Atua. Born: 1901, Died: 1974. He is a direct descendant of King Fonoti Tupu Tafa’ifa of Samoa. – INFO

The First Samoan Successful Businessman, And a Very Successful Politician:
1. The Leader of ‘The Fono of Faipule’ of Samoa from 1939 to 1947.
2. The Leader of the MAU in Atua from 1935 to his last year for the MAU at Vaimoso in 1942.
3. The Chairman for the Public Works Committee from 1948.
4. A Member of the ‘Legislative Assembly’ from 1948 to 1952 and 1955 to 1957.
5. A Member of the ‘Working Committee of the Constitutional Convention of the Government of Samoa 1954 to 1957.
6. The Founder and Leader of The Samoa Democratic Party established in 1951/1953.
7. He was the first appointed joint Directors of the Bank of Western Samoa 1962/1963.
8. A Member of the Copra Board of the Government of Samoa from 1957 to 1972.
9. The Petition for Self-Government in 1944 by Hon Fonoti leader of Fono of Faipule that he presented directly to New Zealand Governor-General Sir Cyral Newall in June, and much more directly to the Prime Minister the Rt. Hon Peter Fraser on the 20-26th of December the same year 1944. The United Nations approval on the 13st December 1946. The newly Samoan flag was raised on the 1st June 1948. Samoa’s Freedom confirmed!
10. A Major Global Recognition of Fonoti of Western Samoa, hes rated at the same level as Gandhi in India and three others for World Peace and Freedom 1945.
From Book: The Evolution of International Human Rights; Visions Seen: Edition2: by Regents Professor Paul Gordon Lauren.
Peace and a Charter with Human Rights: (chapter 6: Page 176)
Thus, many victims in the west began to join with many others like Gandhi in India, Ho Chi Minh of Indochina, Nkrumah and Kenyatta of Africa, Carlos Romulo of the Philippines, and Fonoti of Western Samoa in regarding the right of self-determination as absolutely necessary for International Peace.
The Universal Declaration of Human Rights: (Page 207)
The well-known vocal opponents of colonialism as China, Iraq, Mexico, and the Soviet Union. They battled over the text of each and every trusteeship agreement, trying to drive the specific conditions toward a greater emphasis on the rights of the peoples of these territories. In this regard, they strongly criticized a number of the early draft proposals from the colonial powers, but praised the commitment from the New Zealand that its agreement with Western Samoa would be “In effect a Self-contained Bill of Rights for the Inhabitants.

Click on the 3 url links below to view more original copies of Fono of Faipule proceedings on Hon J.B. Fonoti leadership and more confirmed from documents on lands and titles court final decision case in 1952 :

Link: FonoFaipule

Link: CourtDocuments1952

Link: ThreePowerKingdomVsSamoaCustomKingdomAndHonFonotiMavaegaTofigaMaloSamoa

Back left: Tofaeono, Tualaulelei Mauri, Tu'u, Afamasaga Kalapu. Front Left: Hon Fonoti Mata'utia Ioane Brown and Mr Fred Betham. Govt trip to NZ to bring the Mace for the Parliament House of Samoa In 1955. Mace: Symbol of the United Kingdom of British partnership of the Queen in Parliament House of Samoa.

Stand left: Hon Tofaeono Fa'agi, Hon Tualaulelei Mauri, Hon Tu'umatavai, Hon Afamasaga Kalapu. Sitting Left: Hon Fonoti Mata'utia Ioane Brown, and Hon Mr Fred Betham. Govt trip to NZ to bring over the Mace the symbol of the British Emperor for the Parliament House of the Government of Samoa in 1955.

On January 1, 1962, Western Samoa became the first independent state in the tropical South Pacific, and also the world’s first independent “micro-state.” Malietoa Tanumafili (ii) and Tupua Tamasese Mea’ole were joint Heads of State for life. Mata’afa Faumuina Fiame Mulinuu (ii) was Western Samoa’s first Prime Minister. (1a. Davidson 1967: 408-411) Note: The Government of Samoa founded in God: Fa’avae i le Atua Samoa.
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In 2003, A Major Global Recognition for Fonoti of Western Samoa. The Book: The Evolution of International Human Rights; Visions seen; by Regents Professor Paul Gordon Lauren. Edition 2. (Chapter 6: P. 176) Peace and a Charter with Human Rights: “Thus, many victims in the west began to join with many others like Gandhi in India, Ho Chi Minh of Indochina, Nkrumah and Kenyatta of Africa, Carlos Romulo of the Philippines, and Fonoti of Western Samoa in regarding the right of self-determination as absolutely necessary for international peace”. (P. 207) The Universal Declaration of Human Rights: “In this regard, they strongly criticized a number of the early draft proposals from the colonial powers, but praised the commitment from the New Zealand that its agreement with Western Samoa would be “in effect a self-contained Bill of Rights for the inhabitants”. (Regents Professor Paul Gordon Lauren: World Peace and Freedom 1945: Nobel Peace Institute and the United Nations)

In March, 1952, Fonoti Ioane Brown Quote: “Ole Suafa Fonoti o Lotofaga Atua o le Tama a Salevalasi, Ole Fu’a maualuga e mamalu ai Salevalasi i fafo i Samoa”.

(”e ufiufi a le tama’imoa i le tanoa, ae ioio lava..”)

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24
Nov
08

LAND & TITLE COURT FINAL DECISION: FIAME MATA’AFA VS FONOTI IOANE BROWN 1952

NOTE: Click on each image to enlarge size:

FONOTI MATA’UTIA IOANE BROWN O LOTOFAGA ATUA ILE AIGA PA’IA O SA-LEVALASI, MA FIAME MATA’AFA FAUMUINA MULINUU (II) MA SALEVALASI. OLE FA’AIUGA ILE FA’AMASINOGA I MULINUU SAMOA LANDS & TITLE COURT 1952.

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TALA I LE MAFUA’AGA UA ALI’ITA’I AI FALEATA I LE SUAFA FAUMUINA LE TUPUFIA

Ua maliu Tuia’ana Tuiatua Faumuina le Tupufia ona tau ai lea o le taua ina ua fia Tupu uma le fanau a Faumuina, e iai Fonoti, o le teine o Samala’ulu, ma Va’afusuaga Tole’afoa; “le Tupufia o le Faumuina”.

Ona papae ai lea o lo latou taua i Leulumoega e ta’ua o le taua o le Paegauo, o le taua po’o ai o le a e’e iai Papa. O le vevesiga ma le a’afia uma ai o Samoa ona po’o ai o le a Tupu. Ua uma le taua ua manumalo Fonoti ona o le tulaga fulisia o Samoa sa lagolago ia te ia. Ona faae’e ai lea o Papa e fa o le Tuiatua, Tuia’ana, Vaetamasoali’i, ma le Gatoaitele ia Fonoti ma avea ai ma Tupu Tafa’ifa o Samoa. Ona finagalo lea o le Tupu e fia asia le Itumalo o Faleata. Ona o le tasi lenei o Itumalo na tau malosi i le itu taua a le Tupu o Fonoti ma ona tofiga ‘O Faleata, o le Itu Autasi ia Lufilufi ma Leulumoega ma Tuisamau. ‘O le ava a Faleata e fevala’aua’i. Na fa’apea ai fo’i se fuaitau; “O le sola a Faleata e sola ae vave mai”.

O Fonoti o lona tina Manalelei po’o Talaleomalie, o Manalelei Talaleomalie o lona tina Aloalonei, o Aloalonei o lona tina Unusialetoa, o Unusialetoa o lona tina Letele-o-Talaia le alo o Mata’afa o Ululoloa i Faleata, o le fai’a lea a Fonoti le Tupu ma Faleata i lena vaitau o le soifuaga.

Na malaga ai lea o le Tupu o Fonoti i Faleata. O iai i Vaimoso le tagata malosi ma le toa lenei e igoa ia Tiufea. Ona alu ane ai lea o Tiufea ia Fonoti ma lana manulele. Ua fa’alele manu nei le Tupu o Fonoti ma Tiufea. Ua fa’alele e le Tupu o Fonoti le manulele a Tiufea, ua lele aluga ma ifo mai ma tu i le a’ao o le Tupu. Ona fa’alele lea e Tiufea o lana manulele, ua na ona apata e fia lele ma pa’u mai ua tu i le ua o Tiufea. Ua fa’apea lava ona faia e le manulele le apata e fia lele, ma pa’u mai ma tu i le ua o Tiufea.

Ona malele lea o le Tupu o Fonoti ia Tiufea ma Faleata a’o potopoto iai ma le Tupu e fa’apea: “Tiufea, tu’u lou igoa o Tiufea, ae o le a e igoa ia ‘Manuleleua’ e manatua ai pea e Faleata lenei lava aso.” O lona tau, o le’a ou ‘Une’ lou Ao o le ‘Mata’afa i Atua’. Ae aumai le Suafa o lo’u tama o ‘Faumuina ete Ali’ita’i iai (Faleata)’. O to’oto’o fo’i ia o i Faleata Sasa’e ua fa iai to’oto’o o Faleata e o’o mai i aso nei. “Puni loa le Mata’afa, ae puni matatogo Faleata”.

O LE GAFA O MANALELEI TALALEOMALIE LE TINA O LE TUPU TAFA’IFA O FONOTI:
Usu #2 Tuiavi’i le alo o Tui-Toga (viii) ia Letele Talaeia le alo o Mata’afa i Ululoloa Faleata, fa’aee le gafa o Taua’aletoa (tama), ma Unisialetoa (teine).
Usuia Unisialetoa e Malietoa Sa o Mulifanua, fa’aee le gafa o Togia, Ifopo, ma Aloalonei (teine).
Usuia Aloalonei e Vaovasa o Gataivai i Savaii, fa’aee le gafa o Manalelei (teine: po’o Talaleomalie).
Usuia Manalelei po’o Talaleomalie e Tuia’ana Tuiatua Faumuina Le Tupufia, fa’aee le gafa o Fonoti (tama ulumatua “Ole Alii o Aiga”, ma le Tupu Tafa’ifa o Samoa).

Usu #1 Fonoti le Tupu Tafa’ifa ia Fuatino le alo o To’alepaiali’i i Satapuala Aiga Satuala, fa’aee le gafa: o Muagututi’a (tama ulumatua ‘O le Alii o aiga’).
Usu #1 Muagututi’a ia Poto le alo Amituana’i Manaia o Si’ufaitoto’a i Faleata, fa’aee le gafa: o Seutatia (teine ulumatua ‘Feagaiga ale Aiga’, na tofia e ala’ala ile Maota o Mulinu’u Lalogafu’afu’a ma Sepolata’emo i Lufilufi o Tumua Atua).
Usuia Seutatia o Mulinu’u i Lufilufi e Lilomaiava Nailevai’iliili o Palauli i Savai’i, fa’aee le gafa: o Nofoa-tolu Lilomaiava Vae-ole-nofoa-fia (tama: Ulua’i suafa ‘Nofoatolu’ na e’e ile Maota o Mulinu’u Lalogafu’afu’a ma Sepolata’emo i Lufilufi o Tumua Atua)
Usu Nofoatolu Lilomaiava Vaeolenofoafia ia Sinaivaiana le alo o Va’afusuaga o Faga i Savai’i, fa’aee le gafa: o Fonoti Nofoatolu Laufeti’iti’i (tama) [Fonoti o Lotofaga Atua].
Usu Fonoti Nofoatolu Laufeti’iti’i o Mulinu’u i Lufilufi ia Va’asa le alo o Fiame Muagututi’a le Sa’ofaapito ma le Aiga Pa’ia o Salevalasi i Lotofaga Atua, fa’aee le gafa: o Fonoti Oliovaigafa (tama ulumatua ‘O le Alii o aiga’), Nofoatolu Ti’auliva’a (i), ma Lagouta (teine) – [Sa-Fonoti o Lotofaga Atua]
(O Fonoti Oliovaigafa na ai Ali’i mai iai Molio’o ma le Ailaoa e fai ma o latou Ali’i e iai le ulua’i Suafa Fonoti sa ala’ala i lona Maota o ‘Vainiu’ i Faleapuna. Na maliu ai lava le Ali’i ma sa lagomau ai lava. E pa, e leai sona suli. Ae fa’asolo le Suafa ma le gafa o Fonoti le Tupu Tafa’ifa i Lotofaga Atua i suli o Nofoatolu Ti’auliva’a, ma le teine o Lagouta).
(“Fonoti o Lotofaga i Atua o suli tau toto ma le suafa o Fonoti le Tupu Tafa’ifa o Samoa”)

O Va’asa o le alo o Fiame Muagututi’a, o le tasi ole to’afa o lo’o fa’alupe nei i Lotofaga o “Alo-tau-tino ole Sa’ofa’apito ua Fiame”. Ole to’afa lenei e filifili po’o ai so latou suli e nofoia le suafa Fiame, pe’a avanoa. Na usu Fiame Muagututi’a ia Masu le alo o Sitagata Timalesa o Lotofaga fotuai mai o Leaegalesolo (tama), Fuiava’iliili (tama), Va’asa (teine), ma Va’aloa (teine). O le Mavaega a Fiame Muagututi’a Le Sa’ofa’apito o le Aiga Pa’ia o Sa-Levalasi i Lotofaga Atua, E na’o i la’ua teine o Va’asa: Fonoti, ma Va’aloa: Fiame na tofia e alaala (Maota) i gatai’ala i Mala’e i Mulifusi ma Tanumaleu, po’o le Malae o Papa o le Aiga Pa’ia o Sa-Levalasi i Lotofaga Atua.

O LE FIAME LE SA’OFA’APITO MA LE AIGA PA’IA O SALEVALASI I LE MALAE O LOTOFAGA I ATUA

Na ta’oto le fa’atafa o le Tupu Tafa’ifa o Salamasina ile Malae o Mulifusi i Matafagatele, ua ta’ua nei ole Malae o Lotofaga i Atua i aso nei. Na to’ai le toma’aga a Manalelei Talaleomalie ia Tupuola Folopapa i Tanumaleu, ole Malae ua ta’úa o Lotofaga i Atua i aso nei. Ona o’o mai lea ile taimi o Fiame Muagututi’a o ia lea na fa’ato’a sa’ofa’apito ole Malae ua ta’ua nei o Lotofaga i Atua, le Maota o Fiame le Sa’ofa’apito Muagututi’a o Lotofaga Atua. Ole Malae ole fa’autugatagi.

O le ulua’i Fiame o Ufui’avaopupu i Tanumaleu po’o le Malae o Lotofaga i Atua lea ua ta’ua ai nei, na usu ia Levalasi le alo o Tapu o Letaupe i Mata’tufu, fotuai mai o alii nei o Tuiatua, ma le alii o Muagututi’a lea na soso’o ma lona tama ile nofoia ole Fiame. O Fiame Muagututi’a na si’í e Mata’tufu i lalo i Matafagatele, o le ala lea ua ali’i ta’i ai ia Fiame ma sa’ofa’apito iai e o’o mai ile taimi nei ile Malae o Lotofaga i Atua. O ulua’i sa’o sa ala’ala i Tanumaleu lea ua ta’ua nei ole Malae o Lotofaga i Atua, o Tupuola ma Seinafolava. O lo la fa’alagina e fa’apea: Afio mai e na ulua’i sa’o Tupuola ma Seinafolava, Afio mai le fale agafulu o Fiame, Afio mai le falevalu o Seinafolava, Afio mai fa’aulu’ulu Teoteo ma Tumanuvao, Afio mai le ali’i ole ao le tupe na tago’esea Amituana’i, Maliu mai ali’imau o faleupolu Fa’atili ma Lemauga, Susu mai Sitagata ma le va’á na taumualasi ma le aiga Sasitagata, mamalu mai le faleatua.

TOFIGA O LE MALO A FONOTI LE TUPU TAFA’FA O SAMOA (Since: 1600AD)

FA’ALUPEGA AOAO O SAMOA; Tumua ma Pule, Itu’au ma Alataua, Aiga ile tai, ma le Va’a o Fonoti.
TE’O; ‘O oe o le Anava o Taua, ‘Ma lou Manu Samoa.
FIA’AITAGATA; ‘O au Suafa ia o Fatialofa, ma Auelua. ‘O le a fai i la’ua ma Tulauniu o Atua, ‘Punefu o Atua, ‘To’oto’o o le Tuiatua.
MATA’UTIA; ‘O le Va’a o Fonoti, ‘O le Malu o Ma’auga – Leulumoega, ma Lalogafu’afu’a, Lufilufi. ‘Fea, o le Va’a o Fonoti, ‘O fea fo’i e Fa’aopea ia Atua le Fauono.
MOLIO’O; ‘O oe o le Va’a o Fonoti, ‘O oe o le To’o o le Fua.
LEUTELE (Falefa); ‘O oe o le A’ai o le Tupu o Fonoti! ‘Falefa (District), Sanone, Gagaemalae, Saleapaga, Sagapolu, Falevao, Sauago, Saletele, Uafato.
TOFAEONO; ‘E Ono Pou o Lufilufi, Fitu ia te oe. ‘E Iva Pou o Leulumoega, Sefulu ia te oe. ‘E Fitu Pou o le Malietoa, Valu ia te oe. ‘E Tolu Pou o Satunumafono, Fa ia te oe.
O LE VA’A O FONOTI: Samamea, Ma’asina, Lona, Taelefaga, Salimu ma Ma’auga, Musumusu, Falefa, Sanone, Gagaemalae, Saleapaga, Sagapolu, Falevao, Sauago, Saletele, Uafato, Lalomauga, Manunu, Faleapuna, Lufilufi, Saluafata, Fusi, Salelesi Safanua, Fagaloa, Solosolo, Luatuanu’u.
TUMUA O ASIATA: Ole a Falefa Tumua ia te oe (Sa’iliga Malo o Asiata ia Fonoti).

O LE MAVAEGA A FONOTI LE TUPU TAFA’IFA MA LONA USO O VA’AFUSUAGA TOLE’AFOA

Na iloa atu e Tumua ua afio atu Tole’afoa, ona fai atu lea, afio mai i le Maota e te lua talatala ma le Tupu. Tali Tole’afoa, leai oute ava i Tumua, ua lava a’u i lalo o le ulu lea. Ae sa augani atu lona aiga ma Tumua, afio ane ia i le Maota. Na faofale loa Tole’afoa ma sa faa’alia lava lona fa’aaloalo ia Fonoti, ua faae’e o ia i le pou pepe o le isi tala o le Maota o Mulinu’u Lalogafu’afu’a ma Sepolata’emo i Lufilufi Atua.

Ona agiagi atu ai lea o Fonoti le Tupu Tafa’ifa e fa’apea: Tole’afoa e, afio mai o le a totofi ata mea, au’a le nofo lelei ai o lau fanau ma la’u fanau i le lumana’i. O Papa e fa, o le a ia te a’u ma la’u fanau. A’o le Ao o le Tonumaipe’a, o le a ia te oe ma lau fanau. O le a e saofia le Aumaga, o le mea lea e ta’ua ai le Aumaga e Pa’ia, ona o le Ao o Tonumaipe’a ua iai. E te afio i le fala, Na’o oe lava e te nofo i le fala i fafo, E sa se isi o le Aumaga e nofo ise fala. A uma ona mama o le ava, e tu lava le tagata i luga ma lana maga’ava ma tu’u i le tanoa, a’o lau maga’ava e tu mai se tasi na te avatua, ona aumai lea o le tanoa tu i ou luma. A leai se Tupu e alagaina e Tumua, O le a e Tuia’ana Ave’aumalaga. O le a fa’asino fo’i ia te oe upu o le Aualuma. O lou Aualuma o le a tausi e Leulumoega ma e na ta’i Fasito’o-tai ma Fasito’o-uta.

A e toe tago mai i a’u mea, e sauaina oe i le aufuefue ma soloa i le vailalo ma lau fanau. A ou tago atu i au mea ia fa’apea fo’i ona soloa a’u i le aufuefue ma tafea i le vailalo ma la’u fanau.

O le Mavaega lea nai Mulinu’u Lalogafu’afu’a ma Sepolata’emo i Lufilufi Atua a Fonoti le Tupu Tafa’ifa ma lona uso o Va’afusu’aga Tole’afoa, o lo’o tausi iai Samoa i lenei Mavaega e o’o mai i le aso. E tele isi mea ta’ua na maua mai e tagata i le na aso mai tofiga a le Tupu o Fonoti ina o le a maliu. O lea lava e o’o mai i le aso ana tulaga mamalu. E le mafai ona suia ma o lo’o aga’i pea iai fa’aupuga a Samoa i ana mea e fai.

Fai mai le Tupu Tafa’ifa o Fonoti, “E lelepa ia te a’u le vai.” E le toe faia nisi tofiga ma nisi mavaega ua gata ai ia te ia. “O Samoa ua uma ona tofi”.

(“e ufiufi a le tama’imoa i le tanoa, ae ioio lava..”)

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16
Nov
08

Genealogy of Mata’afa Title in Ululoloa to Amaile: Aiga o Sa-Levalasi Atua.

.1. MATA’AFA TITLE FROM ULULOLOA FALEATA TO AMAILE: SA-LEVALASI ATUA:
Usu Tui-Fiti ia Si’uuilasisifo le alo o Tui-Atua Puluitua faae’e le gafa o Fata, po’o Fata-igoatele (Suafa “Fata” o Lotofaga le Aiga Salevalasi).
Usu #1 Fata po’o Fatai-goatele ia Maugaoal’i ile Vaimauga ole Mafa, faaee le gafa o Puatau.
Toe usu #2 Fata po’o Fataigoatele ia Sinasinavaiao le alo o Tuiatua Fogalepulu o Etemuli faae’e le gafa, o Fata (ii), po’o Fata-levave.
Usu Fata (ii) po’o Fata-levave ile tama’ita’i o Fulu’ula-ale-matoto o le ilamutu o Tui-fiti i Lotofaga, fa’aee le gafa: o Leu (teine).
Usuia Leu e Mulisepu, fa’aee le gafa: o Tau’iliili, ma Talalaufala (teine) – (Ona tofia lea o Tauili’ili e lona tama, e alu i Amaile e tapega le a’ai e taunu’u iai le Ali’i o Aiga).
Usuia Talalaufala e le Tuiatua Fa’asoutele i Ti’avea, fa’aee le gafa: o Fililesalue (teine).
Usuia Fililesalue e Leali’ifanovalevale i Palauli, fa’aee le gafa: o Popoai (teine), ma Taufaito’a (teine).
Usuia Popoai e le Tui-Toga, faaee le gafa o Togialelei, ma Tuiavi’i.
Toe usuia Taufaito’a le uso o Popoai e le Tui-Toga, faaee le gafa o Puipuifatu.
Usu Tui-Toga Puipuifatu ia Pulu-mata-moana le alo o Hulu-a-talala o Toga, faaee le gafa o Manaia (tama), ma Faisautele (tama).
Usu Tui-Toga Manaia ia Nafanua le alo o Savea Si’uleo, fa’aee le gafa: o Latuvai (teine).
Usu Tui-Toga Faisautele ia Si’ueatausilinu’u, po’o Painu’ulasi le alo ole Tui-Manu’a, faaee le gafa o Vaetoefaga, ma Ulualofaiga (tama).
Usu #1 Tuiavi’i ia Siaposuisui le afafine o Pei i Sagafili, fa’aee le gafa: Tuifa’asisina (tama: founder of Lilomaiava line: Tuifa’asisina + Ta’atiaifaleolo = Tiumalumatua + Maseima’ava = Tuimalumalilomaiava + Fuataifa’aula = Lilomaiava Nailevai’iliili.).
Toe usu #2 Tuiavi’i ia Letele Talaeia le afafine o Mata’afa i Ululoloa Faleata, fa’aee le gafa: o Taua’aletoa (tama), ma Unisialetoa (teine).
(Unisialetoa + Malietoa Sa = Aloalonei + Vaovasa = Manalelei + Faumuina = King Fonoti.)
Usu #1 Taua’aletoa ia Manunutumate le afafine o Leago Tusi i Safata, fa’aee le gafa: o Mata’utia Le toa.
Toe usu #2 Taua’aletoa ia Palolo le afafine o Lolofie i Lepa, fa’aee le gafa: o Tuilimu (tama).
Toe usu #3 Taua’aletoa ia Suluaso le afafine o Les’a i Satitoa, fa’aee le gafa: o Faliuila.
Toe usu #4 Taua’aletoa ia Falenaoti Fufe’ai le afafine o Tau’iliili i Amaile, fa’aee le gafa: o Tupuola, Tago, ma Pafuti (teine).
Usu Tago ia Momoemai’asa le afafine o Tau’iliili i Amaile, fa’aee le gafa: o Suluo’o (teine), Leilua, Fatialofa, Fa’aautatanu (teine).
Usuia Suluo’o e Togafau (lineage of Taufau Tuia’ana), fa’aee le gafa: o ILimatogafau (tama).
Usu #1 ILimatogafau ia Letele Taneolevao le afafine o Letele i Faleata, fa’aee le gafa: Tuimavave (tama: Amaile).
Toe usu #2 ILimatogafau ia Tautu’uitumu le afafine o Leatigaga i Salelologa, fa’aee le gafa: o Luamanuvae (tama).
Usu #1 Tuimavave ia Salaina’aloa le afafine o Luafalemana (le uso o Galumalemana), fa’aee le gafa: o Fa’asuamaleaui (tama: eldest ‘O Le Alii O Aiga).
Toe usu #2 Tuimavave ia To’oa le afafine o Malietoa Tuilaepa, fa’aee le gafa: o Tuitogamatoe (teine), ma Tau,iliili (tama).
Toe usu #3 Tuimavave ia Letelesa le afafine o Faumuina i Faleata, fa’aee le gafa: o Silupevailei (tama: youngest from third spouse)
*Usu Mata’afa Fa’asuamaleaui ia Leativaosalafai le afafine o Lealamanu’a, fa’aee le gafa: o Mata’afa Filisounu’u (tama: Amaile)

2. LAGI MUAGUTUTI’A LINE – LEATIVAOSALAFAI + FA’ASUAMALEAUI MATA’AFA:
Usu #1 Muagututi’a le atalii o Fonoti le Tupu ia Poto le afafine o Amituana’amanaia o Si’ufaitoto’a i Faleata, fa’aee le gafa: o Seutatia (teine: ulumatua ‘Feagaiga A Le Aiga’).
Toe usu #2 Muagututi’a ia Agaitafili le afafine o Lilo Seve o Salega i Savai’i, fa’aee le gafa: o Mata’utia (tama), Fualau (tama), ma Talopatina (teine).
Toe usu #3 Muagututi’a ia Taumata le afafine o Toa’ali’i i Saluafata, fa’aee le gafa: o Fepulea’i (tama), ma Lagi (teine).
Toe usu #4 Muagututi’a ia Fenunuivao le afafine o Leutele i Falefa, fa’aee le gafa: e le fanau, Tupua Fuiava’iliili (tama fai: atalii o Fuimaono ma Oilau o Falealili)).
Usuia Lagi Muagututi’a e Aumoemalogo le atalii o Leotatoga ia Oilau le afafine o Fanene i falealili, fa’aee le gafa: o Lealamanu’a (tama).
Usu Lealamanu’a ia Sina le afafine o Anae i Falelatai, fa’aee le gafa: o Loavaenono (tama).
Toe usu Lealamanu’a ia Va’afusumataala le afafine o Tagaloa i Tufu i Gautavai/Sili Savaii, fa’aee le gafa: o Leativaosalafai (teine).
*Usuia Leativaosalafai e Fa’asuamaleaui Mata’afa i Amaile le atalii o Tuimavave ia Salaina’aloa, fa’aee le gafa: o Mata’afa Filisounu’u (tama: Amaile)

3. FA’ASUAMALEAUI’S DESENDANTS CONFERRED THE MATA’AFA TITLE ON HON FONOTI MATA’UTIA IOANE BROWN IN 1939: Refer to book ‘Tama a Aiga’ by M. Tuimalealiifano
– Fa’asuamaleaui is the eldest (O le Alii O Aiga) son of Tuimavave from his first spouse Salaina’aloa. As Silupevailei younger from Tuimavave third spouse Letelesa.
– Fa’asuamaleaui Mata’afa + Leativaosalafai – Lagi Muagututi’a line.
– Fonoti Lotofaga line – Lagi Muagututi’a – Leativaosalafai + Mata’afa Fa’asuamaleaui in Amaile
– Mata’afa Amaile title was always held by Fa’asuamaleaui line until in 1939 that Fa’asuamaleaui’s desendants conferred the Mata’afa title to Hon Fonoti Mata’utia Ioane Brown, and Silupevailei line for the first time lodged a claim in court for the title by installing Fiame Faumuina Mulinu’u (i). The court decision ruled in favor Silupevailei line to have rights for the first time to the Mata’afa title and conferred it to Fiame Faumuina Mata’afa Mulinu’u (i) of Silupevailei line.
– Why was the title allowed to moved from one line to one that had never held it before? The answer may lie in Mulinu’u’s connections.
– Fiame Faumuina Mata’afa Mulinu’u (i) died in 1949 and the two family line Fa’asuamaleaui and Silupevailei in court. Silupevailei line argued and asked the court to give them another turn on the title as they only held it for 10 years. So the court in 1949 accepted the argument, and awarded the title to the deceased titleholders son Fiame Mata’afa Faumuina Mulinu’u (ii), and Fa’asuamaleaui line to have the next turn to the title Mata’afa.
– In 1977 Fiame Faumuina Mata’afa Mulinu’u (ii) died and the two family line Fa’asuamaleaui and Silupevailei in court. The decision was made back in 1949 by the court for Fa’asuamaleaui line for there turn to the title, and the title Mata’afa was conferred to Fa’asuamaleaui Pu’ela of Vaiala in 1977. NOTE: The court in 1977 did not made any decision on which of the two family line to have the next turn to the title.
– Fa’asuamaleaui Pu’ela died and the title Mata’afa is vacant to this day..
– Fa’asuamaleaui line desendants conferred the Mata’afa title on Hon Fonoti Mata’utia Ioane Brown back in 1939 still stands..

4. NOTE: TITLE FIAME LE SA’OFAAPITO OF LOTOFAGA: Only the Va’aloa and Va’asa line have made claim and successor to the title at this stage. They are the two daughters from the four children of Fiame Muagututi’a of Aiga Pa’ia o Sa-Levalasi at Lotofaga Atua. Hon Fonoti Mata’utia Ioane Brown is a direct desendant of Va’asa. Hon Fonoti Mata’utia Ioane Brown family the Sa-Fonoti of Va’asa line Lotofaga and Va’aloa line with Mata’afa Faumuina Mulinuu family are the successors to take turns on the title ‘Fiame Le Sa’ofaapito’ ma le Aiga Pa’ia o Sa-Levalasi i Lotofaga, Atua.

5. FONOTI OF LOTOFAGA WITH FIAME LE SA’OFA’APITO AND LE AIGA PAIA O SA-LEVALASI IN LOTOFAGA ATUA: Fonoti of Lotofaga is the true heir of Va’asa, the daughter of Fiame Le Sa’ofa’apito Muagututi’a and Le Aiga Pa’ia o Sa-Levalasi in Lotofaga Atua. If the family wants to decide on someone to be bestowed with the title Fiame Le Sa’ofa’apito when the high chief (Sa’o) dies, Fonoti of Lotofaga is the one to face the Aiga Sa-Fiame and the Sa’ofa’apito. The title Fonoti of Lotofaga is also the true heir of Taufagalupe, the daughter of Seinafolava at Lotofaga, the first Teoteo title who is mostly respected by Le Aiga Pa’ia o Sa-Levalasi. The title Teoteo is an ‘igagato’, a title name given from afioga Leota To’omata of Falelimu Solosolo to Taufagalupe. Sumuane’s sister who was the wife of the Alii is the cause of the relationship between Sa-Levalasi and Leota To’omata. That pule ends with the title Fonoti of Lotofaga the Sa-Fonoti Va’asa’s true heirs.

6. GAFA O FIAME LE SA’OFAAPITO MA LE AIGA PA’IA O SA-LEVALASI I LOTOFAGA ATUA:
Usu #2 Tuiavi’i ia Leteleotalaia le afafine o Mata’afa i Ululoloa faaee le gafa o Taua’aletoa (tama), ma Unusialetoa (teine).
Usu#4 Taua’aletoa ia Falenaoti le afafine o Tauilili i Amaile faaee le gafa o Tago (tama) ,Tupuola (tama), ma Pafuti (teine).
Usu Tupuola le atalii o Tauiliili i Amaile ia Lifuti le afafine o Loai i Lotofaga faaee le gafa o Seigafolava (tama).
Usu Seigafolava ia Taufagalupe le afafine o Leilua i Sagone faaee le gafa o Samataua Siuolosega (tama).
Usu Samatau’a Siolosega ia Sivaenae le alo o Po’elaga i Lepa, fa’aee le gafa: o Fiame Ufi’avaopupu (tama: Ole Ulua’i Fiame o Lotofaga), ma Taufau (teine).
Usu Fiame Ufi’avaopupu ia Levalasi le alo o Tapu o Letaupe i Mata’tufu, fa’aee le gafa: o Tuiatua (tama matua: Ole Ali’i o Aiga), ma Muagututi’a (tama: o Muagututi’a lea na suafa ia Fiame o Lotofaga, na soso’o mai i lona tama o Fiame Ufi’avaopupu. Ole Malae o Lotofaga fa’ato’a maua ia Fiame Muagututi’á na si’í e Matatufu i lalo i Matafagatele, o le ala lea ua ali’i ta’i ai ia Fiame ma sa’ofa’apito iai).
Usu Fiame Muagututi’a le Sa’ofaapito ia Masu le alo o Sitagata Timalesa i Lotofaga, fa’aee le gafa: o Leaegalesolo (tama), Fuiava’iliili (tama), Va’asa (teine), ma Va’aloa (teine) – (Ole fanau to’afa lenei o lo’o fa’alupe nei i Lotofaga o “Alo-tau-tino ole Sa’ofa’apito ua Fiame” Ole to’afa lenei e filifili po’o ai so latou suli e nofoia le suafa Fiame, pe’a avanoa).
Usuia Va’asa e Fonoti Nofoatolu Laufeti’iti’i mai Mulinu’u i Lufilufi, fa’aee le gafa: o Fonoti Oliovaigafa (tama), Nofoatolu Ti’auliva’a (tama), ma Lagouta (teine) – [Fonoti of Lotofaga Atua].
Usuia Va’aloa e Luafalemana mai Falefa, faaee le gafa: o Naimanuoletuavao (teine), ma Samugapua’a (tama).
Usuia Naimanuoletuavao e Lesiolagi Falatugatuga mai Salani, faaee le gafa: o Taufagalupe (teine).
Usuia Taufagalupe e Sagapolutele mai Muatele i Aleipata, faaee le gafa: o Faulalo (tama), ma Tuafuamamao (teine).
Usu Faulalo ia Tualauie, faaee le gafa: o Fiame Fa’atala Sipaia (tama).
Toe usu Faulalo i le afafine o Puni i Samatau, faaee le gafa: o Tinifu.
Toe usu Faulalo ia Talalaupola le afafine o Tupuola i Ma’asina i Fagaloa, faaee le gafa: o Aigatupu (teine).
Usuia Tuafuamamao e Leiataua mai Manono, faaee le gafa: o Mulinu’u (tama).
Usu Mulinu’u ia Tina le afafine o Tuitama i Faleasi’u, faaee le gafa: o Salaevalu (teine).
Usuia Salaevalu e Faumuina Tafamanu Misimoa mai Lepea i Faleata, faaee le gafa: o Fiame Mata’afa Faumuina Mulinuu (i).

O le mavaega a Fiame Muagututi’a, E na’o i la’ua teine o Va’asa: Fonoti, ma Va’aloa: Fiame na tofia e alaala (Maota) i gatai’ala i Mala’e i Mulifusi ma Tanumaleu, po’o le Malae o Papa o le Aiga Pa’ia o Sa-Levalasi i Lotofaga Atua.

Click on the following link below to view related article with title court final decision documents on Fiame Mata’afa Faumuina Mulinuu (ii) & Others Vs Fonoti Mata’utia Ioane Brown of Lotofaga Atua in 1952;
Link: CourtDocuments

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15
Nov
08

Kingdom By The Three Powers Vs The Kingdom By Samoan Customs, And Hon J.B. Fonoti Government Appointments Of His Wish For Samoa.

THE KINGDOM OF THE THREE POWERS AND THEIR ASSOCIATES IN SAMOA:

By the late 1880’s it had become clear to the Samoans that whichever party was to be recognized as the Malo must control the succession to the throne. The Papa titles of the Tafa’ifa could be claimed as a prize in war, but national recognition of the titular supremacy signified by the tafa’ifa required all four titles to be bestowed by the Fale-Upolu (Group of tulafale, in this case Tumua and Alataua) of Atua, A’ana and Tuamasaga with a high degree of consensus and common interest. The Samoan conception of a supreme ruler or King. (O le Tupu) referred to the head of a victorious party which ruled by conquest. Such a leadership required the maintenance of control by force, an impossible goal in Samoa since the 1860’s, when European gun boats had given the settlers a balance of power they could exercise to bring down any Samoan Malo.

The massive land claims being made by the settlers might have united the Samoans had demands been made by a single foreign group, but the problem was that resolution of conflicting land claims would satisfy one interest group, but not another. The same was true of the Samoans – any resolution of claims in favour of a particular foreign interest group would mean that some Samoans would lose great amounts of land while others would have their land rights upheld. Therefore the individual interests of each nu’u and sub-district, and of individual matai in many cases, became linked to the support of particular settler factions.

Having won the latest war and seen their German allies deport Malietoa, Tamasese’s supporters declared him tupu and tafa’ifa (although he held only one of the papa, Tuia’ana). The declaration was interpreted by Samoans and settlers alike as a declaration of German supremacy in Samoa, and opposition to it coalesced around Tuiatua Mata’afa Iosefo. In the absence of Malietoa Laupepa, some of the branches of the Sa-Malietoa had conferred the Malietoa title upon Mata’afa; thus his network of family connections covered most districts in Samoa. Mata’afa’s one political liability was that he was Roman Catholic in a predominantly Protestant land. However, as a focus for anti-German feeling, he received supporters. Once again the elaborate political negotiation to raise any army began.

War broke out in 1888 but unlike previous wars, settlers and their property were targets on both sides. The consuls sent for naval reinforcements and in 1889 seven warships were anchored off Apia. Their involvement was cut short by a hurricane which sent six of the ships, three Americans and three German, to the bottom of the sea with a loss of 155 foreign lives. Mata’afa’s side won the war but, ironically, at the very time he was being hailed as tupu by most of Samoa, the three powers declared Malietoa Laupepa to be King by the terms of the Berlin Act to which all three were signatories. The decision was foolish because it took no account of the realities of the situation in Samoa. The Germans would not accept Mata’afa because he had brought about the defeat of their supporters. The British and Americans took the view that Tamasese was a German puppet. Malietoa was a compromise choice for the three powers but not for the Samoans. When he was brought back to Samoa in 1889, he at first recognized the Mata’afa victory and his right to be tupu. The condominium established by the Berlin Act had not been put into effect but Malietoa was soon persuaded to accept the office that the foreign powers offered him by their recognition on paper. The problem was to obtain Samoan acknowledgment of his right to be King. Accordingly Malietoa’s supporters began to raise any army so as to make his government legitimate by defeating Mata’afa in war.

The case for Malietoa asserted that he held the four papa titles and was tafa’ifa, Lauaki Namalau’ulu Mamoe of Safotulafai in Savaii, asserted that Malietoa had no such recognition. He claimed that Malietoa held none of the titles, not even that of Malietoa, since none had been bestowed by Samoan custom. In this contention Lauaki was supported by the Orators of Malie and Manono.”

Namalau’ulu Lauaki Mamoe: A great Samoan hero and his loyalty to Samoan Customs. He never made it back to Samoa from here.
lauaki-website

Then another tradition says that from 1810 the most powerful chief was Tamafaiga of Manono who gave himself the title as ‘Tupu o Salafai’. According to this tradition the only person to hold the Tafa’ifa since Salamasina was Fonoti who was known as Fonoti the King!

mataafa-tamasese-german1In 1912, One of the changes, the German administration had apparently achieved its long-term objectives of understanding the traditional forces in Samoa politics, while maintaining a semblance of local participation in government. There was no more TUPU, nor even ALI’I SILI, but the two Fautua were appointed. Tumua and Pule were for a time silenced, all decisions on matters affecting lands and titles were under the control of the Governor. To complete the process, the Fa’alupega for all Samoa was revised. The Fa’alupega which had been nationally accepted from at least the late 19th century (and probably for much longer than that) was as follows:

“Tulouna a Tumua ma Pule,
Tulouna a Itu’au ma Alataua,
Tulouna a Aiga-i-le-Tai,
Ma le Va’a-o-Fonoti.”
(exclude the new addition below as at current)
Tulouna a Tama ma a latou aiga,
Po’o aiga ma a latou tama.

This Fa’alupega firstly recognized the authority and identity of principal districts of Samoa through their spokesmen –Tumua ma Pule, Itu’au ma Alataua, Aiga I le Tai, ma le Va’a o Fonoti – and the highest titles which were bestowed by these groups. It concludes with the recognition of the great maximal descent groups of Samoa and their ’sons’ who had been chosen to hold the highest titles.

The new Fa’alupega of German Samoa apparently required for Malietoa Tanunafili and Tupua Tamasese to be sworn on oath and to change this Samoa’s historical Fa’alupega to the new fa’alupega as follows:

“Tulouna a lana Maiesitete le Kaisa o le tupu mamalu o lo tatou malo kasialika aoao.
Tulouna a lana afioga le kovana kasialika o le sui o le kaisa I Samoa nei.
Susu mai Malietoa, Afio mai Tupua
Ua fa’amanatuiana ai aiga e lua I o oulua tofiga Kasialika o le Fautua.
Tulouna a le vasega a Faipule Kasialika o e lagolago malosi I le Malo.
Afifio mai le nofo a vasega o tofiga Kasialika o e usu fita I le tautua I le malo.”

“Aiga e lua” referring here to the two fautuas Malietoa and Tupua is a classic example of the changes to the original Samoa that got carried through by New Zealand period of ruling Samoa right down to this present time.

“Aiga E Lua” o Samoa, the Two Main Families of Samoa: Le Aiga Pa’ia O Sa-Levalasi, and Aiga Fa’alagilagi Le Aiga Sa-Tuala. Aiga fa’avae ma le faitaulia a ia e lua o lo’o ta’oto ai gafa Tautupu ma gafa Tautamali’i o Samoa.

FOOTNOTES RECORDED BY HISTORIANS:
On May 3, 1841, Malietoa Vai’inupo (”Tavita”), the first tama ‘aiga chief to accept Christianity, died in Western Samoa. (1e. Theroux 1985)

On February 25, 1868, Malietoa Laupepa was proclaimed “King” of Samoa. The French reported that the proclamation was inspired by Consul J.C. Williams. (1a. Morrell 1960: 213)

On February 7, 1876, Malietoa Laupepa, appointed as “King of Samoa” by the Three Consuls and held aboard HMS Barracouta, was persuaded to sign a letter requesting the arrest of Samoa’s “Premier” Albert Barnes Steinberger as “a liar and an impostor.” (1a. Morrell 1960: 218)

On December 23, 1879, German warships saluted Malietoa Talavou and the new Samoan flag, which was red with a white cross and a white star in the upper left quadrant. (1e. Theroux 1985)

On March 12, 1880, Malietoa Talavou was declared “King of Samoa” and his nephew, Malietoa Laupepa was declared “Vice King,” to succeed his uncle on his death, by the Three Consuls (Britain, Germany and the United States). (1a. Bryan 1927: 27)

On March 24, 1880, in Apia, an agreement was entered into by “King” Malietoa Talavou, the Government of Samoa and the “Three Consuls” (Britain, Germany and the United States) whereby the Consuls agreed to support the King, and to provide an Executive Council for him. The members of the council were Thomas Trood, English, Minister of Finance; Alfred Volkmann, German, Minister of Public Works and Jonas M. Coe, American, Minister of Justice. (Jonas Coe was the father of Emma Eliza Coe, the legendary “Queen Emma”). (1d. Bryan 1927: 27)

On March 10, 1881, Malietoa Laupepa was crowned “King of Samoa” by the “Three Consuls” (Britain, Germany and the United States). (1d. Bryan 1927: 27)

On March 19, 1881, Malietoa Laupepa, nephew of the recently deceased Talavou, was declared “King of Samoa” by the “Three Consuls” (Britain, Germany and the United States). Tupua Tamasese Lealofi I and Mata’afa Iosefo opposed the declaration. (1d. Bryan 1927: 27)

On April 21, 1881, Tupua Tamasese Lealofi I, Mata’afa Iosefo and other disaffected chiefs met at Leulumoega, ‘Upolu. Tamasese was declared “King” of Atua and A’ana districts, to hold office for two years, and then to be succeeded by Mata’afa. (1d. Bryan 1927: 27)

On July 12, 1881, the “Lackawanna Agreement,” mediated by Captain J.H. Gillis of the U.S. Navy, commanding USS Lackawanna, was signed in Western Samoa, dividing kingly honors between “King” Malietoa Laupepa and “Vice King” Tui A’ana Tupua Tamasese Titimaea. (1a. Gray 1960: 68-69)

On December 31, 1885, in Apia, the German Consul in Apia, Dr. C. Stuebel, hauled Malietoa Laupepa’s flag down, explaining that Malietoa had no jurisdiction over the municipal zone. (1a. Gilson 1970: 379, 381)

On August 27, 1887, German warships distributed declarations of Tui A’ana Tupua Tamasese Titimaea’s war on Malietoa Laupepa (which lasted until September 1, 1887. (1a. Gray 1960: 78)

On September 15, 1887, Captain Eugen Brandeis, a German officer, forced Malietoa Laupepa and other chiefs to sign a document declaring Tui A’ana Tupua Tamasese Titimaea as “King of Samoa.” (1a. Gray 1960: 78-79)

On September 5, 1888, the German warship SMS Adler (”Eagle”) shelled Manono and Apolima, which were strongholds of Malietoa’s forces. (1a. Gray 1960: 83)

On March 23, 1889, Malietoa Tanumafili I was installed as “King of Samoa” by the “Three Consuls.” (1a. Gray 1960: 99)

On June 14, 1889, the Berlin General Act proclaimed the “independence and neutrality of the Samoan Islands” and provided for the recognition of Malietoa Laupepa as “King.” Another aim of this Act was “to avoid all occasions of dissensions between their respective and the people of Samoa” while at the same time “promoting as far as possible the peaceful and orderly civilization of the people.” (1a. Kennedy 1974: 96-98; 1d. Coleman 1959: 7)

On December 5, 1894, the Samoan Land Claims Commission held its last meeting, awarding 75,000 acres to German claimants, 36,000 to English petitioners, and 21,000 to American hopefuls. (1a. Gilson 1970: 411; 1a. Gray 1960: 97-98)

On November 15, 1898, after a great fono in Mulinu’u, Mata’afa Iosefo was declared “King.” This news was relayed to the Three Consuls and the Chief Justice. The Germans supported his claim, but Malietoa Tanumafili I and Tui A’ana Tupua Tamasese Lealofi I denied the legality of the election. Chief Justice William Lea Chambers agreed with them, and civil war once again erupted. (1a. Gilson 1970: 426-427).

On December 31, 1898, in accordance with the provisions of the Berlin General Act, the Chief Justice of Samoa ruled that Malietoa Tanumafili I would be “King,” as the three claimants (Malietoa, Tui A’ana Tupua Tamasese Lealofi I and Mata’afa Iosefo) could not agree among themselves as to who should be “King.” Once again, civil war broke out. (1d. Bryan 1927: 40)

On January 4, 1899, The “Three Consuls” (of England, Germany and the United States) recognized Mata’afa Iosefo’s government in Apia. (1e. Theroux 1985)

On March 31, 1899, Mata’afa Iosefo’s forces defeated Malietoa Tanumafili’s army in yet another phase of Samoa’s ongoing, European-inspired civil war. (1a. Gray 1960: 101)

On March 1, 1900, Dr. Wilhelm Heinrich Solf, newly appointed as Imperial Governor of German Samoa (called “Deutsch Samoa” or simply “Samoa” by the Germans), raised the flag at Mulinuu, Apia “in the presence of a great audience. The Kaiser’s proclamation, read at the ceremony, stated: ‘We hereby, in the name of the Empire, take these islands under our Imperial protection.’ The Governor declared the islands to be German territory, and hoisted the Imperial flag of the Consulate to the strains of ‘Heil Kaiser, Dir,’ ['Hail to you, Emperor'] and a national salute from H.I.G.M.S. [His Imperial German Majesty's Ship] Cormoran and the U.S.S. Abarenda, Commander B.F. Tilley, United States Navy, Commanding. Governor Solf visited Abarenda the next day and was saluted with 13 guns.” (1d. Bryan 1927: 43; 1a. Field 1984: 26)

On March 9, 1900, Mata’afa Iosefo thanked the German Emperor (Kaiser Wilhelm II) for taking possession of the western Samoan islands, and expressed his wish that the German colonial laws would be made “in conformity to the rules and customs of the Samoans.” (1a. Hempenstall 1978: 33)

On September 16, 1901, Dr. Wilhelm Heinrich Solf, Governor of German Samoa, issued a proclamation which forbade the Samoan custom of fa’atafea (banishment of wrong doers). The proclamation closed with this statement: “This is my word; everyone must obey it.” (1b. Theroux 1983b: 55)

On February 18, 1903, German Samoa’s Governor, Dr. Wilhelm Heinrich Solf, proclaimed the establishment of a Land and Titles Commission. (1a. Davidson 1967: 81)

On June 21, 1913, Following the decree from the German Emperor that the Governor may select one member of the Tupua family and one member of the Malietoa family to be his trusted friends and advisers, Tupua Tamasese and Malietoa Tanumafili (i) were sworn in as Fautua. Their remuneration was 2000 Deutschmark per year. (Tom Overhoff: 2009)

On November 14, 1915, Lauaki Namulau’ulu Mamoe, one of the leading orators of his time and a leader of the Mau a Pule, died on Tarawa in the Gilbert Islands. He was en route to Samoa from Saipan in the Mariana Islands, whence he had been exiled by the Germans. (1a. Davidson 1970: 298)

On December 6, 1928, Tupua Tamasese Lealofi III, a leader of Western Samoa’s Mau, was found guilty of a summons relating to the non-payment of a poll tax in 1927, and was sentenced to six weeks in jail. He was also found guilty of resisting arrest, and was sentenced to a six-month jail term in New Zealand. (Field 1984: 131-132)

IT IS OBVIOUS THAT THIS WILL BE WHERE THE CHANGES MADE TO THE ORIGINAL SAMOA FOR THERE OWN BENEFIT OF THE GERMAN GOVERNOR AND THE TWO FAUTUAS! AND ONE THING GOT CHANGED BACK TO ITS ORIGINAL WAS THE ‘ALL OF SAMOA FA’ALUPEGA’, BUT THE REST MAY LIES IN WHAT HAS BEEN WRITTEN AND GIVEN AS SAMOA’S HISTORY TO WHAT IT IS THERE TODAY. WOULD BE THE REASON ALSO WHY THERE ARE MANY CASES ON DIFFERENT VERSIONS TO AN EVENT FROM THE HISTORY OF SAMOA.

Related info from book: Queen Victoria Born to Succeed. By Elizabeth Longford. (Chapter: The Labourers Task: Page 543)

One of the difficulties hardest to bear was the Kaiser’s exultant telegram congratulating President Kruger, who was still supposed to acknowledge the Queen’s suzerainty, on the preservation of his independence. This loaded word produced a howl of rage from millions of British throats, hitherto choked by shame. The Prince of Wales wanted to know what business the Emperor has to send any message at all? He only hoped William would not appear at Cowes this year. (The Kaiser had distinguished himself the year before by picking a quarrel referring to his uncle as the old popinjay, and going home early in a huff).

It was not till 1899 that the Kaiser’s huge white yacht, Hohenzollern, was invited once more to the solent. A dispute which Lord Salisbury over Samoa prevented the visit. Queen Victoria heard that William was ‘vy cross – declared Ld Salibury to be his enemy & that he won’t come to England while he is P.Miniter. She commented drily: ‘I think he will have to wait a long time.’ Three weeks later the Kaiser gave her his own version of the facts: Lord Salisbury had treated Germany in ‘the most unhappy way’ over Samoa – ‘a stupid island which is a hairpin to England compared to the thousands of square miles she is annexing right and left unopposed every year. The hairpin seems to have pricked the conscience of the Queen. She had already observed, apropos of China, that she ‘could not quite understand why nobody was to have anything anywhere but ourselves. Accordingly, she invited the Kaiser to Windsor for the autumn. This visit, the last, was an unexpected success, William being ‘sensible & kind’ and Dona ‘not at all stiff’.

TOA O SAMOA FONO: MULINUU.

THE KINGDOM OF SAMOA BY SAMOAN CUSTOMS IN THE 1600’S

THE SUCCESSION LINE OF THE ROYAL FAMILY OF SAMOA; One of the early kings was Tuia’ana Tuiatua Faumuina Le Tupufia. He had three children. The sons were named Fonoti and Va’afusuaga Tole’afoa, and the daughter was named Samala’ulu. They are Known commonly in traditions of Samoa as ‘The Three of Faumuina‘. Each child was by a different mother, but Tuia’ana Tuiatua Faumuina before he died, he did not declare a decree for a successor to rule on the throne. And intimately, this is why his three children, Fonoti, Samala’ulu and Va’afusuaga Tole’afoa entered into war to fight it.. the dispute was also taken up by their maternal relations that became so intense that war was raged to who will be King. And began the arise of famous family clans of Samoa such as Sa-Tuala, Sa-Levalasi, Sa-Asomua, Sa-Tago, Sa-Amituana’i, Sa-Tunumafono and others. This is also why their father or the title Faumuina is greeted as ‘Le Tupufia‘. Tupufia, means or referred to of his children that they all wanted to be King! in the 1600’s

Va’afusuaga Tole’afoa and sister Samala’ulu had joined up to opnose the claim of there brother Fonoti to the Tafa’ifa Kingship. When Fonoti found out that his brother and sister had gained many followers, he went to Leulumoega where the dispute was being fought and sought the assistance of the High Chiefs and leading orators of other districts. This was the war that Mano’o of Samatau said before the war: if Fonoti runs into the sea, we will dry up the sea, if he runs into heaven, we will rip it open to catch him. As a result he was pursued with great zeal; Chief Veletaloola of Faleata defeated Mano’o. Fonoti then waged war against his kin ‘The Paegauo War’ for the four Papa titles to proclaim the Tafa’ifa Kingship, and was successful and he was ultimately proclaimed King Fonoti Tupu Tafa’ifa of Samoa. Bestowed on him and helder of the four high titles: Tuia’ana, Tuiatua, Vaetamasoalii, and Gatoaitele. In our traditions this war is known as ‘the war between Samala’ulu and Fonoti’. ‘The Paegauo War’ or ‘The War of the Tupufia!’ King Fonoti Tupu Tafa’ifa conferred many honours upon those chiefs and Districts that had fought for him and such honours and privileges are honoured by the ‘Tumua and Pule’ right down to the present time.

The distribution in the war was about as follows: with Fonoti: Fagaloa, Faleapuna, Falefa, Saluafata, Solosolo, Vaimauga, Faleata, Safata, Falealili, Fasitoouta, Falelatai, Manono, half of Lufilufi and of Leulumoega; on the side of Va’afusuaga Tole’afoa and Samalaulu were: Aleipata, Luatuanuu, Lepa, Lotofaga, Siumu, Faleula, Sagana, Sale’imoa, Faleasi’u and Samatau, also all of Savai’i island through Va’afusuaga Tole’afoa’s influence.

The Vaa-o-Fonoti with a district of its own was one of the rewards conferred upon Faleapuna, Safanua and Fagaloa, for the part they had played in the dispute and for contending with Manono, Sapapali’i and Saleaumua in the fighting that took part on the sea. People in these places not only sided with King Fonoti but their fleets also contributed greatly to King Fonoti’s victory. In reward King Fonoti Tupu Tafa’ifa designated them an independent political district in its own right. The Aiga-ile-Tai district comprises the villages on the small island of Manono and Apolima, and their associated villages along the north western tip of A’ana district, they sided with Va’afusuaga Tole’afoa and Samala’ulu against their brother Fonoti in the war. Probably in an effort to reconcile old differences, King Fonoti Tupu Tafa’ifa designated these villages an independent political district in its own right-thus the political district Aiga i le Tai, literally family on the seaward side. The Alataua and Itu’au are sub-districts of Tuamasaga, Safata and Faleata respectively, having war and divination functions referred to, and singled out for special honour for traditional reasons. King Fonoti also conferred honours on Tofaeono, Aiono, Misa and the privilege of receiving food on Faleata.

King Fonoti also granted Ulualofaiga complete power over Fagaloa District and in addition he gave Ulualofaiga the village of Amanave in Tutuila. This village is controlled in this manner right down to the present day and the authority as recognised by the American Government. The title Vaa-o-Fonoti was also given to Ulualofaiga by King Fonoti as a name for his war canoe and this title distinguishes the District down to the present day. There were also many other rewards conferred too numerous to mention. King Fonoti Tupu Tafa’ifa of Samoa was the only and the last Tafa’ifa king since Queen Salamasina. ‘And there was no other war ever since or even recorded in history that by anyone raised against King Fonoti Tupu Tafa’ifa to claim the four Papa titles, nor through Fonoti Kingly lineage “the Sa-Fonoti” right to this present time.

King Fonoti Tupu Tafa’ifa to conferred upon the chiefs and the village communities Faleapuna and Fagaloa the right to call themselves “VA’A O FONOTI” (Fonoti’s ship: as stated in his fa’alupega as the All Samoa Fa’alupega). It was the mark of distinction of a real Kingdom that King Fonoti Tupu Tafa’ifa was able to issue such decrees and appointments (tofigas) which were looked upon as dogmas.

Va’a o Fonoti Territory: consist of places of Faleapuna, Fagaloa areas, became the naval war fleet in Fonoti’s war of succession. “The Vessel of Fonoti”. King Fonoti le Tupu Tafa’ifa (King of all Samoa) had rewarded the village districts of Faleapuna and Fagaloa in Atua for fighting bravely for him in his struggle for power by conferring as Va’a o Fonoti was the fleet of the Fonoti the King that was named the “Le laulualofaiga”. One of the two main well known fleets in the history of Samoa as : Fuatau a Tagaloa Funefe’ai: Ta i le Vai, ma Fonoti le Tupu, Va’a o Fonoti. (The battle fleets of Tagaloa Funefe’ai: Ta i le Vai, and the King Fonoti: Va’a o Fonoti).

Falefa District rewarded as King Fonoti’s city: Tulouna a oe faleatua (greeted you the house of Atua; the chiefs, Saluafata, Luatuanu’u. ‘Crown Council’), Tulouna a oe le a’ai o Fonoti (greeted King Fonoti’s city; symbol of honour for Falefa for bravery in Fonoti’s war; just as Faleapuna and Fagaloa are called King Fonoti’s ship). Other shortened version of the fa’alupega of Falefa involve the mention of the two titles: Iuli and Moe’ono, alternative ways of referring to the body of orators, who could be called: le a’ai o Fonoti le Tupu, or the people of Fonoti. …And may you never have to leave your fly whisk, or your precious stick oh Matua of our village.. and also may the leaves be always strong on your trees, people of (the King) Fonoti. The person of Fonoti refers to “Fulumu’a”, being part of his ceremonial greeting. This image refers to Gods power to end anyone’s life at any time and implies the recognition of God’s love to the assembly for fleeting to King Fonoti.

The Following All Samoa Fa’alupega from Two Occasions: (1.) TUMUA MA PULE; from the four wars by warrior Goddess Nafanua for the titles, and Tupa’i Vaililigi bestowed the four titles to Salamasina. (2.) AIGA I LE TAI, VA’A O FONOTI, and ITU’AU MA ALATAUA; from the war for the four titles of Tui-A’ana Faumuina’s Tupufia his three children; Fonoti, Samala’ulu and Va’afusuaga Tole’afoa. All of Samoa involved in this war, Fonoti won and was bestowed the four titles; by Samoan Customs. (the four titles: Tui-Atua, Tui-A’ana, Gatoaitele, and Vaetamasoali’i; as Tupu Tafa’ifa of Samoa).

King Fonoti Tupu Tafa’ifa of Samoa of his wish with his brother:
Then Toleafoa went and arrived at Lufilufi in Atua where the Palace of Mulinu’u Lalogafu’afu’a and Sepolata’emo the royal seat of Lufilufi the Tumua – the principal place. He sat down beneath the breadfruit trees and did not enter the house. So the king spoke: Be welcomed in the house so that we can confer well with each other. So Toleafoa said: Your pigeon flight and gentle winds descend upon me. I shall not enter your house except for the tumua. So Fonoti and the Tumua said: Welcome here in the house, let us confer with the king.

So Toleafoa came and sat down by the in-between posts at the rear. Again the king spoke: Come, that I may determine our affairs so that your children and mine will fare well. The following were the words of Fonoti: The four high titles be for me and my children, while the title Tonumaipe’a be for you and your children, so that you will lead the ‘aumaga. Therefore the’ aumaga shall be known to be sanctified. And because you have the title Tonumaipe’a, you shall sit on a mat, and only you alone shall sit outside on a mat, and the others of the ‘aumaga shall be forbidden to sit down on a mat. When the kava chewing is over, all shall stand up with their kava bits and put them in the kava bowl; but for your kava bit someone else shall rise and take it there. Then let the kava bowl be brought and placed before you. If no king is announced by the tumua, you are to be Tuiaana ave’au malaga and the words of the aualuma are to point to you. Your aualuma is to be cared for by Leulumoega, and Fasito’otai and Fasito’outa are to protect them.

However, if you ever again reach for my things, you and your children shall be the prey of the creepers (in the grave) and water shall flow below you; if on the other hand I should reach for your things then I and my children shall be seized by the creepers and water shall flow under me.

O TOFIGA MA LE MALO O LE TUPU O FONOTI MA LANA MAVAEGA: APPOINTMENTS OF KING FONOTI’S GOVERNMENT AND HIS WISH FOR SAMOA:

ALL SAMOA FA’ALUPEGA; Tumua ma Pule, Itu’au ma Alataua, Aiga ile tai ma le Va’a o Fonoti.

TE’O; ‘O oe o le Anava o Taua, ‘Ma lou Manu Samoa!

FIA’AITAGATA; ‘O au Suafa ia o Fatialofa, ma Auelua. ‘O le a fai i la’ua ma Tulauniu o Atua, ‘Punefu o Atua, ‘To’oto’o o le Tuiatua!

MATA’UTIA; ‘O le Va’a o Fonoti, ‘O le Malu o Ma’auga – Leulumoega, ma Lalogafu’afu’a, Lufilufi. ‘Fea, o le Va’a o Fonoti, ‘O fea fo’i e Fa’aopea ia Atua le Fauono!

MOLIO’O; ‘O oe o le Va’a o Fonoti, ‘O oe o le To’o o le Fua!

LEUTELE (Falefa); ‘O oe o le A’ai o le Tupu o Fonoti! ‘Falefa (District), Sanone, Gagaemalae, Saleapaga, Sagapolu, Falevao, Sauago, Saletele, Uafato.

TOFAEONO; ‘E Ono Pou o Lufilufi, Fitu ia te oe. ‘E Iva Pou o Leulumoega, Sefulu ia te oe. ‘E Fitu Pou o le Malietoa, Valu ia te oe. ‘E Tolu Pou o Satunumafono, Fa ia te oe!

LE AVA A FALEATA E FEVALA’AUA’I; ‘O Faleata, ‘O le Itu Autasi ia Lufilufi ma Leulumoega ma Tuisamau! Additional honours given by King Fonoti. – Faleata, already under Atiogie called ‘Faleo’o O Faiga Malo’. Na fa’apea ai fo’i se fuaitau; “O le sola a Faleata e sola ae vave mai”.

ONA O LE SU’EGA MALO A ASIATA ia Tuiatua Tuia’ana Gatoaitele Vaetamasoali’i Fonoti, O le Tupu Tafa’ifa o Samoa, lea ua tofiaina Asiata; ‘O Le A Falefa Tumua Ia Te Oe! – already three Tumua in Upolu, Lealali in Leulumoega and Malietoa Savea with Fata and Maulolo as Tuisamau. Now Four Tumua to Asiata with King Fonoti Tupu Tafa’ifa of Samoa’s consent.

CHIEF AIONO: Na tofia e Fonoti le Tupu Tafa’ifa e tali ona lafo (toga) i so’o se mea fai a Samoa, O le La’aufausia, ma lana Igoaipu o le Laveisela po o le Matamatamuliulu; the chief Aiono of Fasito’o-uta may accept mats from public ceremonies as he is entitled to do so by ancient authority of the King Fonoti Tupu Tafa’ifa of Samoa.

CHIEF TAI: O Taimalie o le Utu a Sa-Tuala, ma lana Igoaipu o le Tuitama’ioletupu. O le mauaina e Tai ma Aiono o Mano’o ma le mea na tupu iai, o le mafua’aga lea ma le fuaiupu e fa’apea;” O le tolotolo i Vaialua” Nofoalii.

O LE AGAGA FIAFIA TELE O LE TUPU O FONOTI; ‘Ua avea ai ma tulaga ese i le nofo i le fa’afeagaiga ma le to’aiva. O lea sa ia manatua ai le fa’aeaea a Fenunuti ma Leatuavao le aiga a lona masiofo, e pei o le fetalaiga ‘E Manatua Pule Ae Le Manatua Fa’alaeo’. O le pogai lea na liliu a’e loa ai le Tofa Mamao i Lana Afioga le Tupu, ma pa’u ai lana malelega i lona AIGA-SATUALA a’o potopoto i lona maota i Nu’uausala e fa’apea; ‘Fa’afetai Fenunuti ma Leatuavao i lo Oulua Fa’aeaea, ‘O Lea Ia Amata Atu I Le Aso Nei, ‘Na Avea Oulua Ma MATUA MAVAE O Le AIGA SA-TUALA!

ATAMAIOALI’I; ‘Personal Servant of Tuia’ana Appointed by King Fonoti. It is said the first Atamaioali’i came from Manuleg’a, a former inland village near Palauli. Since he served well and skillfully, King Fonoti said, “you can eat my things because you served me well”. King Fonoti’s food was tabu for others.

A’O TAPUA’I TUMUA I LE FA’ATAFA A LE TUPU O FONOTI; ‘Ua Sa le Sami, ‘Sa le Vao, ‘Sa le Vanimonimo, ‘Ua Pa’ia le Ele’ele. ‘E Sa se isi ona pisa! Na ioe Tumua i le malelega a le Tupu o Fonoti e fa’apea;

MUAGUTUTI’A; ‘O le a e alu ma lou Muagututi’a, ‘Ma lou Fuatino, ‘Ma lou Faumuina, ‘Ma lou Melegalenu’u. ‘E te nofo i Mulifusi. ‘E te tua ia Sa-Tuala, ‘Ae tausi oe e Leulumoega!

APUTIPUTIATOLOULA; ‘O le a e fo’i oe, ‘Ma lou Muagututi’a ma lou Fuatino, ‘Ma lou Melegalenu’u ma lou Faumuina, ‘Ma lau igoaipu o le Fetaia’imauso! e fa’amanatu ai le aso lenei fa’ato’a fetaia’i ai oulua le uso. I se taimi mulimuli ane na fesuia’i ai igoaipu a Tau’iliili ma lona atali’i. ‘O le ala lea o le taumafa o Tau’iliili i le igoaipu o le Fetaia’imauso, au’a o le igoaipu na aumai i le Tupu ua mana’o iai.

LE MAVAEGA A FONOTI LE TUPU; ‘Ona agiagi atu ai lea o Fonoti e fa’apea.. “Tole’afoa e, afio mai o le a totofi a ta mea, au’a le nofo lelei ai o lau fanau ma la’u fanau i le lumana’i. ‘0 le Ao o le Tonumaipe’a, ‘O le a ia te oe ma lau fanau. ‘O le a saofia le Aumaga, o le mea lea e ta’ua ai le aumaga e pa’ia. ‘E te afio i le fala, ‘Na’o oe lava e te nofo i le fala i fafo, ‘E sa seisi o le aumaga e nofo ise fala. ‘A uma ona mama o le ava, e tu lava le tagata i luga ma lana maga’ava ma tu’u i le tanoa, ‘A’o lau maga e tu mai se tasi na te avatua, ona aumai lea o le tanoa tu i ou luma. ‘A leai se Tupu e alagaina e Tumua, ‘O le a e Tuia’ana Ave’aumalaga! ‘0 le a fa’asino fo’i ia te oe upu o le aualuma. ‘O lou aualuma o le a tausi e Leulumoega ma e na ta’i Fasito’otai ma Fasito’outa!”

O PAPA..! O LE A IA TE A’U MA LA’U FANAU! ‘A e toe tago mai i a’u mea, sauaina oe i le aufuefue ma soloa i le vailalo ma lau fanau. ‘A ou tago atu i au mea ia fa’apea fo’i ona soloa a’u i le aufuefue ma tafea i le vailalo ma la’u fanau.

O LE MAVAEGA lea nai i Mulinu’u ma Sepolataemo i Lufilufi Atua, a Fonoti le Tupu ma lona uso o Va’afusu’aga Tole’afoa, fa’apea fo’i ma le tele o tofiga ma isi ua le mai taulia sa faia mai i le Tupu o Fonoti e le mafai ona suia,MA O LO’O TAUSI IAI SAMOA MA ANA MAMALU E O’O MAI I LE ASO!

O LE VAA O FONOTI

Samamea – Maasina – Lona – Taelefaga – Salimu Ma Maauga – Musumusu – Falefa – Sanone – Gagaemalae – Saleapaga – Sagapolu – Falevao – Sauago – Saletele – Uafato – Lalomauga – Manunu – Faleapuna – Lufilufi – Saluafata – Fusi – Salelesi – Safanua – Fagaloa – Solosolo – Luatuanu’u.

Back left: Tofaeono, Tualaulelei Mauri, Tu'u, Afamasaga Kalapu. Front Left: Hon Fonoti Mata'utia Ioane Brown and Mr Fred Betham. Govt trip to NZ to bring the Mace for the Parliament House of Samoa In 1955. Mace: Symbol of the United Kingdom of British partnership of the Queen in Parliament House of Samoa.

Stand left: Hon Tofaeono Fa'agi, Hon Tualaulelei Mauri, Hon Tu'umatavai, Hon Afamasaga Kalapu. Sitting Left: Hon Fonoti Mata'utia Ioane Brown, and Hon Mr Fred Betham. A Government trip to NZ in 1955 to bring over the Mace the symbol of the British Emperor for the Parliament House of the Government of Samoa.

HON FONOTI MATA’UTIA IOANE BROWN O LOTOFAGA ATUA

On March 3, 1930, the leaders of the Mau met with Western Samoa’s Administrator, Colonel Stephen Shepard Allen, New Zealand’s Defense Minister, Mr. John Cobbe, and other officials in the guest house of Tupua Tamasese Mea’ole in Vaimoso. Also in attendance were Malietoa Tanumafili I, Mata’afa Faumuina Fiame Mulinu’u I and Tuimaleali’ifano Siu (whose sons would play prominent roles in Western Samoa’s future). The meeting was lengthy; nothing was accomplished, and tensions increased. (1a. Field 1984: 183-185)

On March 4, 1930, a second meeting of Mau leaders with New Zealand’s Defense Minister John Cobbe and Western Samoa’s Administrator, Colonel Stephen Allen, ended in failure. (1a. Field 1984: 184-186)

On March 7, 1930, the final meeting between Western Samoa’s Administrator, Colonel Stephen Allen, New Zealand’s Defense Minister, Mr. John Cobbe and Mau leaders Malietoa Tanumafili I, Tupua Tamasese Mea’ole, Mata’afa Faumuina Fiame Mulinu’u I and Tuimaleali’ifano Siu was held in Vaimoso. The Mau leaders presented a letter which contained a list of questions regarding the status of their petition to the League of Nations, and their dissatisfaction with Judge Luxford’s verdict regarding the murder of Paramount Chief Tupua Tamasese Lealofi III on “Black Saturday” (December 29, 1929). (1a. Field 1984: 188-189)

On March 3, 1933, Western Samoa’s Chief Judge, John Luxford, found Mau leader O.F. Nelson guilty of sedition, and sentenced him to eight months in jail and ten years in exile. He was immediately taken to Vaimea Jail. (1a. Field 1984: 210)

On January 9, 1939, At Mandates Commission of the League of Nations, when considering the annual report of the NZ Government on Samoa, some very pertinent questions were asked such as: “Is it true that the anti-MAU movement called the Malo was as strong in numbers and influence as the organization dominated by Mr. Nelson and his son-in-law Tamasese?” and “Would it be fair to say that the MAU could be identified with the Nelson family, and the anti-MAU with the family of Malietoa?” (Tom Overhoff: 2009)

THE PETITION FOR SELF-GOVERNMENT IN SAMOA BY LEADER FAIPULE HON FONOTI IN 1944, AND THE UNITED NATIONS APPROVAL ON THE 13th DECEMBER 1946. THE NEWLY SAMOAN FLAG WAS RAISED ON 1st JUNE 1948: SAMOA’S FREEDOM!

The Petition for Self-Government in 1944 by the Fono of Faipule leader Hon Fonoti that presented directly to New Zealand Governor-General Sir Cyral Newall in June, and much more directly to the Prime Minister Rt. Hon Peter Fraser on the 20-26th of December the same year.

While engaged to all Business Activities, J.B. Fonoti was also a Successful Politician. He was the leader of ‘The Fono a Faipule’ of Samoa from 1939 to 1947. And was also a ‘Member of the Legislative Assembly’ from 1948 to 1952 and 1955 to 1957. And a member of the ‘Working Committee of the Constitutional Convention of the Government of Samoa 1954 to 1957. He was the leader of the MAU for Atua also in 1935 to his last year for the MAU Vaimoso 1942. He was the founder and leader of The Samoa Democratic Party in 1951/1953. When the New Zealand Governor-General Sir. Cyril Newall visited Samoa in June 1944, and New Zealand Prime Minister Hon Mr. Peter Fraser on a special fono in December the same year 1944. Leader Hon J.B. Fonoti presented directly the Petition for Self-Government in Samoa to them. While welcoming, leader Faipule Hon J.B. Fonoti and on behalf of the Fono of Faipule, expressed solid criticism of New Zealand policy.

There was, then, in Western Samoa from 1942 onwards a growing and audible demand for self-government, a demand by no means silenced by New Zealand paternalism.

In 1944 that which had long been familiar to experts was made explicit. In June of that year the Governor-General, Sir Cyril Newall, paid his third visit to the territory, and Samoan spokesman, while welcoming him on behalf of the Fono of Faipule, expressed solid criticism of New Zealand policy. “The Samoans, said leader Hon Fonoti, had been denied even that element of self-government which had been established in Tonga and Fiji and in Eastern Samoa. The terms of the mandate have imposed on New Zealand the solemn duty of educating the Samoans to self-government and the terms of the Atlantic Charter express the same aim for the small nations of the world. Thirty years have passed since New Zealand took over Western Samoa and we are appreciably no nearer this goal. We wish to assure your Excellency that the Samoan people are loyal to the Union Jack, His Majesty the King and the British Empire, but after thirty years of New Zealand administration during which our justified aspirations were ignored and our requests for improvements were rejected, we have lost confidence in the trusteeship of New Zealand which has shown a lack of interest in the territory and treated its people as stepchildren. In the Governor’s phrase, – a nettle is appearing”.

In the month that followed, political activity continued, and the Faipule leader Hon Fonoti formed a standing committee to keep in touch with the workings of the administration: move with sinister precedents. In the view of an experienced observer; it was not far removed from the formation of another Mau. By this time, however, it was known that the Prime Minister himself was about to visit the mandated territory. He was known to have a keen personal interest in its administration, of which since 1940 he had been the ministerial head; but the tremendous pressure of war issues during the ensuing years had kept his main attention elsewhere.

In 1944, as the war situation eased and as politics in Western Samoa grew more tense, he carried out a long-deferred intention to discuss the matter on the spot with those most concerned. This visit of the Prime Minister Peter Fraser to Western Samoa and his discussions with a special Fono in December “proved a Crucial Event in New Zealand’s Relations with the Samoans and in the Evolution of New Zealand’s conception of trusteeship”.

In the first place, the Samoans formulated their political demands for themselves, as well as for the New Zealand Government, with unmistakable clarity. The Faipule leader Hon Fonoti presented to the Prime Minister a list of remits, most of which were detailed and aimed at progressive displacement of Europeans by Samoans in administration, but which was headed by a firm request for self-government after the war. The Samoan spokesman leader Hon Fonoti, told Mr. Fraser frankly that he was “quite convinced that the Samoans are able to have their own government at the present time. The only obstacle that we think is in the way is the communication with other countries. We are quite able to run our own affairs in Samoa; but obstacles had always been put in the way of such overseas contacts. ‘As regards the government of the people and preservation of the peace, many years ago the Samoans had their own forms of government before the Europeans set up government in this country, he said. These governments functioned very successfully, except when Europeans interfered. Moreover, at that time the Samoans had no education whatever, nowadays they have a fair amount of education, they have a very good understanding of affairs and they are quite able to control their own government.”

Demands were made in direct by leader Hon J.B. Fonoti with a firm request for Self-Government in Samoa, included: 1. The association with the administration of Samoa representatives to deliberate with Fonoti on ‘All Government Matters, 2. The appointment of Samoans as head of the Native Affairs Department, 3. For a Department of Agriculture to be established, 4. Promotions of Samoans through out the Public Service to more senior posts, 5. For the training overseas of the Ablest Samoan Youths for further Education, 6. And For Limiting the Term of Expatriates to Three Years and No more than Six years. etc.

Several important, though uncomplicated, decisions were made by New Zealand straight away. In particular: 1. A Scholarship Scheme to inaugurated to enable some of the Ablest Samoa Children to go to New Zealand for further Education, 2. A new appointment was made to the Office Of Administration. “This was not an easy position for the New Zealand Government to fill”.

NOTE: The Trusteeship Agreement for Western Samoa was submitted and approved by the General Assembly of the United Nations Organisation on the 13 December 1946! “Its details belong to the history of self-government in Samoa”.

“Samoa’s Freedom From New Zealand Was Approved And Confirmed!”

At the beginning of June two major events gave further evidence of the growing reality of the new political era. On 1st of June 1948 the newly authorized flags of Samoa-the Samoan flag (which had just been adopted) and the New Zealand flag, flown conjointly, were raised ceremonially for the first time. An official anthem, ‘The Banner of Freedom’, had been composed for the occasion. In the wave of sympathetic emotion which the occasion generated the country gained a national flag, a national anthem and a national day, all of which established a hold on the people’s minds and survived as part of the ceremonial superstructure of the nation state that they were engaged in creating. The next day the High Commissioner opened the first session of the Legislative Assembly.

Immediately after the general election of 1951, Hon Fonoti had taken the novel step of calling a public meeting of Samoans to consider the formation of a political party. Out of this action the Samoan Democratic Party emerged. Men as varied in their outlook as Hon Fonoti himself, the practical businessman, in Hon Fonoti’s case, to retain Political Office. During its first year the party claimed a membership of about three hundred and the support of a substantial proportion of the untitled people; after that it gradually declined. But the election of Hon Fonoti to the Fono of Faipule late in 1951 and his return to the Legislative Assembly in 1954 Gave It A Place In The Formal Political Life Of The Country; and others who were associated with it have since served in Public Office. Though it was never able to function effectively as a pressure group, it’s more important policy proposals were brought clearly before the public; even thou the Party died, its Ideals have lived on in the form of demand for Universal Surfrage with Matai Candidacy, the replacement of The Fono a Faipule and The Legislative Assembly by One Body, and Personal Tax Services.

THE LEADER OF SAMOA: O TOFIGA O LE MALO MA LE MAVAEGA O HON FONOTI MATA’UTIA IOANE BROWN: HON FONOTI MATA’UTIA JOHN BROWN GOVERNMENT APPOINTMENTS OF HIS WISH FOR THE OFFICIAL CONSTITUTIONAL GOVERNMENT OF SAMOA IN 1954-57

HON FONOTI: Hon Acting Chairmen and the dignity of the Convention.

Samoa, I would say that even though this Convention has been somewhat long, it is now seven weeks since it started, but it is not a thing that we should be downhearted about, and from what I have heard of the expression of options I am convinced that the majority of us here are very keen indeed to secure Self Government – Samoa Independence!

I agree that this Constitutional Convention is something like religious conference because we have very often mentioned the Name of God, whereas this Convention is the Constitutional Convention of the Government of Samoa. I feel that the reason why perhaps we are mentioning the name of God so very often is because we are anxious that a Government of Samoa be founded in God, and I wish to say therefore to you Samoa well done indeed.

I am convinced that Samoa is very anxious to take over the reins of her own Government and regain her rights to take charge of her own affairs. I would appeal to you Samoa, do not worry. Why should we worry? We are present here, we are all Samoans and this is Samoa which is holding this Convention. I would drew your attention Samoa to the fact that we are a Christian Country and this week we will again commemorate the Birth of Christ, the King of Peace on Earth. Peace and Goodwill onto men. Therefore, I would say let us not worry. I am convinced that our people of Samoa are Christians, and where there is right according to the Will of God, there will be success. I would say therefore, to you to bear in mind that Samoa are Christian people and as Christians we should certainly exercise, faith, hope and Love.

By faith I mean we should believe there is a God; by hope I would say that we should meet the temptations of the devil with hope in God; and by Love I mean that we should have that love whereby we will reject all that is bad and all that is not right that we may do, as good Christian people to love God and love our people and do that which is right. Samoa, let us be bound together in that love which should bring us together and do what is right for the benefit of our country in future.

Now I will express my opinion on this question of Head of State. Before I actually state what I have in mind I should first like to remind this Convention that I am one of the members of the Working Committee, and our recommendation of course is before you now; but since listening to the expressions which have been made in this Convention since the time we started I have come to some conclusions and formed my own opinion which I now wish to express before you.

First, I would say that the present Council of State be retained and that its name be changed to Fono of Ta’imua – Council of Leaders.

Second, that the four royal sons of Samoa be in that Council.

Third, that the Hon Tupua Tamasese and Hon Malietoa, as they are at present, the Head of State, but for the future that there be only one Head of State and that the Head of the State be selected from within that fono of Ta’imua, and that the four nominates the Head of the State. If they are unable to do that then the matter should be referred to the Legislature for final action.

Those are my wishes to this question of Head of the State and I would say if we should do that and carry hope, faith and charity in our hearts, and trust in our Lord, and trust in our own people, I am sure we will succeed and be bound together in Unity and Friendship. And I would say not only for the present, but also for the future, so that the very words written in our flag which is flying above us now God is The Foundation of Samoa may be always in our hearts. I have many other points which I would have liked to speak about but time is short.

Sir, I move that the Steering Committee comprising 5 Samoans and 2 Europeans namely:
Hon Leutele Te’o,
Hon Tualaulelei,
Hon Gatoloai Peseta,
Hon To’omata and Va’ai Kolone,
Hon H.W. Moors and Hon A.M. Gurau
, Be Confirmed.
Hon Fiame Mata’afa Faumuina Mulinuu (ii) as for the first Prime Minister of the Government of Samoa(Hon Fonoti called a meeting and confirmed this offer with his district and family of Sa-Levalasi at Lotofaga Atua).

HON FONOTI MATA'UTIA IOANE BROWN OF LOTOFAGA ATUA. POLITICAL REFERENCE: Hon Fonoti Mata’utia Ioane Brown of Lalovaea and Lotofaga Atua. Born: 1901, Died: 1974. He is a direct descendant of King Fonoti Tupu Tafa’ifa of Samoa. – INFO

The First Samoan Successful Businessman, And a Very Successful Politician:
1. The Leader of ‘The Fono of Faipule’ of Samoa from 1939 to 1947.
2. The Leader of the MAU in Atua from 1935 to his last year for the MAU at Vaimoso in 1942.
3. The Chairman for the Public Works Committee from 1948.
4. A Member of the ‘Legislative Assembly’ from 1948 to 1952 and 1955 to 1957.
5. A Member of the ‘Working Committee of the Constitutional Convention of the Government of Samoa 1954 to 1957.
6. The Founder and Leader of The Samoa Democratic Party established in 1951/1953.
7. He was the first appointed joint Directors of the Bank of Western Samoa 1962/1963.
8. A Member of the Copra Board of the Government of Samoa from 1957 to 1972.
9. The Petition for Self-Government in 1944 by Hon Fonoti leader of Fono of Faipule that he presented directly to New Zealand Governor-General Sir Cyral Newall in June, and much more directly to the Prime Minister the Rt. Hon Peter Fraser on the 20-26th of December the same year 1944. The United Nations approval on the 13st December 1946. The newly Samoan flag was raised on the 1st June 1948. Samoa’s Freedom confirmed!
10. A Major Global Recognition of Fonoti of Western Samoa, hes rated at the same level as Gandhi in India and three others for World Peace and Freedom 1945.
From Book: The Evolution of International Human Rights; Visions Seen: Edition2: by Regents Professor Paul Gordon Lauren.
Peace and a Charter with Human Rights: (chapter 6: Page 176)
Thus, many victims in the west began to join with many others like Gandhi in India, Ho Chi Minh of Indochina, Nkrumah and Kenyatta of Africa, Carlos Romulo of the Philippines, and Fonoti of Western Samoa in regarding the right of self-determination as absolutely necessary for International Peace.
The Universal Declaration of Human Rights: (Page 207)
The well-known vocal opponents of colonialism as China, Iraq, Mexico, and the Soviet Union. They battled over the text of each and every trusteeship agreement, trying to drive the specific conditions toward a greater emphasis on the rights of the peoples of these territories. In this regard, they strongly criticized a number of the early draft proposals from the colonial powers, but praised the commitment from the New Zealand that its agreement with Western Samoa would be “In effect a Self-contained Bill of Rights for the Inhabitants.

To view related original documents on Fonoti click on: Documents

(”e ufiufi a le tama’imoa i le tanoa, ae ioio lava..”)

TUMUA MA PULE, ITU’AU MA ALATAUA, AIGA I LE TAI, MA LE VA’A O FONOTI, TAMA MA A LATOU AIGA PO’O AIGA MA A LATOU TAMA.

The first PM of the Government of Samoa: Fiame Mata'afa Faumuina Mulinuu (ii) Independence in 1962.

11
Nov
08

Paramount Chief Title Tuimanu’a Alexander Brown Of Ti’avea Aleipata (Scotishman from Great Britain)

A BRIEF HISTORY OF TUIMANU’A ALEXANDER BROWN OF TI’AVEA AT ALEIPATA SAMOA: A SCOTISHMAN AND A CAPTAIN OF HIS SAILS TRADING CARGO SHIP FROM SCOTLAND IN THE 18TH CENTURY.

Father: David Brown (of Leif South, Scotland).
Mother: Ann Bain (of Scotland: David’s first Spouse).
Children:
1. Son: Alexander Brown, Born: 28 July 1810 Scotland, baptism 12 August 1810.
2. Son: James Brown, Born: 17 October, 1813 Scotland, baptism 14 November 1813.
3. Son: David Brown, Born: 30 December 1814 Scotland, baptism in 1815.
Father: David Brown (of Leif South, Scotland).
Mother: Ann Murdock (of Scotland: David’s Second Spouse).
Children:
1. Son: David Lennox Brown, Born 22 July 1822 Scotland, baptism 2 September 1822.

Alexander Brown was born on the 28th July 1810 in Scotland, Great Britain. His father was Mr. David Brown a Scotishman and his mother was Ann Bayne. Mr David Brown a Soldier and Blacksmith in his rank of profession was resided at Leith South, Scotland in Great Britain. Alexander Brown, was known in Samoa as ‘Tuimanu’a’ the holder of the high ranking title, a Paramount Chief in the 18th century bestowed to him by the King Tui-Manu’a of Manu’a island at Tau where abouts the palace of the King or Queen Tui-Manu’a in the eastern side of Western Samoa (apparently by Tui-Manu’a Kamalita). Tuimanu’a Alexander Brown was a Captain of his trading cargo ship a widow and a rank in profession of Trading at the age of 67 years. Tuimanu’a Alexander Brown was legally married to Miss. Ainoama on the 21st day of April 1877. Alexander was 67 years of age and Miss Ainoama was 22 years old. (Miss Ainoama was a daughter of high-talking Chief: Su’a of Samusu village in Aleipata, Upolu in Western Samoa.) And they have four children namely: Phobe Malia Brown, Anne Vaelua Brown, Emma Brown, and William Vili Brown. Alexander Brown was also accompanied by his eldest daughter name Miss Jane (Sieni) Brown from his former spouse back in Scotland. He also had six Hawaiian crewmen picked up from Hawaii on the way to the Manu’a island for his four sails cargo ship.

Father: Alexander Brown of Ti’avea Samoa (Son of David Brown and Ann Bain in Scotland).
Mother: Ainoama Su’a o Samusu Ti’avea Samoa (Daughter of Su’a in Samusu Samoa).
Married: 21 April 1877 Samoa: British Consulate: British Conculs District of Navigators Islands. This marriage solemnized between them in the British Consulate according in the precises of the Counsellors: Edward A. Liaradro, and in the presence of: D.S. Parker, and T. Dickson.
Children:
1. Daughter: Phoebe Malia Brown, Born: Feburary 1873.
2. Daughter: Ann Vaelua Brown, Born: March 1875.
3. Daughter: Emma Brown, Born: June 1880.
4. Son: William (Vili) Brown, Born: 25 July 1881.

Also Note: Tuimanu’a Alexander Brown of Ti’avea apparently had 6 other Spouses in Samoa.

Miss Jane Brown was married to high chief Tupuola Auvale of Lona Fagaloa in Upolu Samoa. Tuimanu’a Alexander Brown has great grand daughters through the marriage of his daughter Miss Jane Brown, that one was named ‘Afugalooletuimanu’a’, the name means ‘The Forgotten or Lost or Spent Strengh (sweat) of Tuimanu’a Alexander Brown in Fagaloa’. Another granddaughter was named ‘Afulilooletuimanu’a’, the name means the ‘Tuimanua’s Strength (afu)’ buried in Fagaloa. There is a lake there in the village of Fagaloa called ‘AFULILO’ was named after Tuimanu’a Alexander John Brown. The other granddaughter was also named ‘Fa’amalumalugaoletuimanu’a’, the name was to remind the bestowing of the highest Title Tuimanu’a to Alexander Brown of Scotland by King Tui-Manu’a of Manu’a island. Apparently it was not a paramount chief title as usual but a King’s Title of a small island of Manu’a and its true. You would prove that if refer to history between the King Tui-Toga of Tonga and King Tui-Manu’a of Manu’a in those days that we still follow up.

Tuimanu’a Alexander Brown also his grandson through the marriage of his daughter Anne Vaelua Brown to Tafea Lomano Maioa of the King Fonoti Tupu Tafa’ifa of Samoa family lineage. He was Fonoti Mata’utia Ioane Brown of Lotofaga and Lalovaea. Born 17 Feb 1901 and died 9 Oct 1974. He was educated at Marist Brothers School from 1908 to 1913. He worked with Westbrook and Burns Philip as a Salesman, and he became an entrepreneur himself and was the first Samoan successful businessman to distinguish himself in this field. He owned many successful companies, and was also became the most successful planters and cattlemen. BUSINESSMAN: He owned a Bakery in Matatufu, A trading vessel called ‘Star Of The Sea’ and was engaged in Agricultural Development in Lotofaga. (In time he became The Most Successful of Planters and Cattlemen). He Established the First Primary School at Lotofaga which taught Agricultural Subjects. J.B. Fonoti Set up: The Samoa Traders Ltd.; The Mulifanua Trading Ltd.; and JB Fonoti Ltd. He also opened a Supermarket including a Bakery with delivery for Aleipata district and Lotofaga district Atua from his property in Lotofaga. POLITICIAN: While engaged to all Business Activities, Hon J.B. Fonoti was also a Successful Politician. He was the leader of The Fono a Faipule of Government of Samoa from 1939 to 1947. And was also a member of the Government of Samoa Legislative Assembly from 1948 to 1957. And a member of the Working Committee of the Constitutional Convention of the Government of Samoa in 1954 to 1957. He was the leader of the MAU for Atua also in 1935 till his last year for the MAU in Vaimoso 1942. He was the founder and leader of The Samoa Democratic Political Party in 1951/1953. When the New Zealand Governor-General Sir.Cyril Newall on his third visit to Samoa on June 1944, while welcoming, leader Faipule Hon J.B. Fonoti and on behalf of the Fono of Faipule, directly expressed solid criticism of the New Zealand policy. And much more directly to the New Zealand Prime Minister the Rt. Hon Mr. Peter Fraser on his visited for a special fono to discuss matters on the spot, on the 20-26th of December the same year 1944. Demands were made by leader Fono o Faipule Hon J.B. Fonoti with a list of remits presented to the Prime Minister, most of which were detailed and aimed at progressive displacement of Europeans by Samoans in administration, but which was headed by a firm request for Self-Government in Samoa after the war. PETITION IN 1944: The Petition for Self-Government in Samoa by the leader of Fono o Faipule Hon J.B. Fonoti in 1944. The United Nations approval on the 13th December 1946. The newly Samoan flag was raised on the 1st June 1948. Samoa’s Freedom confirmed!

Mother: Ann Vaelua Brown (Daughter of Alexander Brown of Ti’avea and Ainoama Su’a of Samusu).
Father: Tafea Lomano Maioa Fonoti (Son of Muaimana, the daughter of Fonoti Teoteo Tuipu’avai of Lotofaga Atua, and Tafea Elise, the son of Fonoti Letaupe Tuipalepale and Lupe Tafea Tuai’ipuniu of Mata’tufu Atua).
Married: The Holy Roman Catholic Church of the Immaculate Conception at Apia on the 18th December 1895. Officiating Minister being Rev. FR. J. Garnier S.M. Witnessed being: Filipo of Falefa, and Victor Aupito.
Children:
1. Son: Ola Mika Brown.
2. Son: Fonoti Mata’utia John Brown, Born: 17 Feb. 1901.
3. Son: Tasala Brown.
4. Daughter: Bella Brown
5. Daughter: Fiava’ai Brown.

Tuimanu’a Alexander Brown of Ti’avea at Aleipata died at the age of 86 on the 10th of August 1896, And was buried in Ti’avea village at his last permanent residence as officiated by Rev. Opapo of Mormon church.

“TI’AVEA UFA MEA (VALELEA), FAGA LE POVI LE LAVEA…” An old saying by Tuimanu’a Alexander Brown that was well known by the people of Ti’avea in Aleipata back in the days. Tuimanu’a Alexander Brown had a cattle farm, and when someone needed cattle, Tuimanu’a Alexander Brown he sometimes lend them his shotgun that when they missed a shot and wasted a bullet, Tuimanu’a Alexander Brown will say “ Ti’avea Ufa Mea, Faga le Povi le Lavea”. The phrase became very popular with the people of Ti’avea back then and in memory of Tuimanu’a Alexander Brown of Ti’avea in Aleipata, Samoa. The Brown family was known and called by the people of Atua back then as “Le Au Tui-Manu’a!”. Understanding is there are Brown families of Tui-Manu’a Alexander Brown in the Manu’a island, Tutuila and Upolu Samoa.

Click on each image to enlarge size:

TUIMANU’A ALEXANDER BROWN’S BIRTH AND BAPTISM INFORMATION LEITH SOUTH SCOTLAND IN 1810: HIS PARENTS WERE MR DAVID BROWN AND MISS ANN BAYNE

alexander-brown-marriage-birth-cert-scan3TUIMANU’A ALEXANDER BROWN COPY MARRIAGE CERTICATE TO MISS AINOAMA IN 1877

alexander-brown-marriage-cert

LETTER BY MATA’AFA ABOUT TUIMANU’A ALEXANDER BROWN OF TI’AVEA IN 1882

Letter about Tuimanua Alexander Brown by Mata'afa in 1882

TUIMANU’A ALEXANDER BROWN’S DAUGHTER ANN VAELUA BROWN MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE IN 1895

anne-vaelua-brown-m-cert-fonoti-tafea-maioa

TUIMANU’A ALEXANDER BROWN’S DAUGHTER ANN VAELUA BROWN’S BIRTH CERTIFICATE IN 1875

genealogy-ann-v-brown-b-certTUIMANU’A ALEXANDER BROWN’S GRANDSON HON FONOTI MATA’UTIA JOHN BROWN’S BIRTH CERTIFICATE IN 1901

jb-fonoti-birth-certHON FONOTI MATA'UTIA JOHN BROWN OF LOTOFAGA ATUA.A SPECIAL NOTE: A’e malamalama i lou gafa ma tagata na e tupuna mai ai, o le a fa’apena fo’i ona ofi atu ia te oe lagona o ia tagata. O TOA O SAMOA. Knowing your genealogy, po’o lou malamalama i le gafa a oe ma lou aiga, e atili fafaga ai le agaga ia te oe o le loto nu’u, ma lou loto aiga.

APIA HARBOUR SAMOA.

06
Nov
08

Original Documents On Hon J.B. Fonoti Govt. Appointments Of His Wish For Samoa 1954-57. His Petition For Self-Government in 1944 And The United Nations Approval In 1946.

The following documents were the only information was kept and found with the Government of Samoa from inquiry of research on Hon J.B. Fonoti. Further down are copies from the NZ Govt. Archive of the Petition for Self-Government in Samoa in 1944 by Hon Fonoti Mata’utia Ioane Brown, the leader of the Fono of Faipule of Samoa that was directly presented to the Prime Minister of New Zealand the RT. Hon Mr Peter Fraser. And also copy of the United Nations approval in 1946 from the United Nations as per requested to the UN. Hon Fonoti Mata’utia Ioane Brown was the leader of the ‘Fono a Faipule’ of Samoa from 1939 to 1947. And was also a ‘Member of The Legislative Assembly’ from 1948, 1950 to 1952 and 1955 to 1957. In 1954 he was a member of the ‘Working Committee of the Constitutional Convention of the Government of Samoa. And was the leader of the MAU for Atua also from 1935 to 1942.

The Petition for Self-Government in Samoa by leader J.B. Fonoti in 1944 was presented directly to New Zealand Prime Minister the Rt. Hon Mr. Peter Fraser and Governor-General Sir Cyral Newall, resulted to approval by the United Nations for ‘Self-Government in Samoa’ on the 13th December in 1946!

Click on each image to enlarge size:

HON FONOTI MATA’UTIA IOANE BROWN STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT APPOINTMENTS OF HIS WISH FOR THE CONSTITUTIONAL GOVERNMENT OF SAMOA IN 1954-57

Hon J.B. FonotiHon J.B. Fonoti

fonoti-info-from-govt-samoa

INTRO ON THE PETITION FOR SELF-GOVERNMENT IN 1944 BY LEADER OF FONO OF FAIPULE HON FONOTI MATA’UTIA IOANE BROWN WAS DIRECTLY PRESENTED TO THE NEW ZEALAND PRIME MINISTER THE RT. HON MR FRASER.

jb-fonoti-and-nz-pm1jb-fonoti-and-nz-pm2jb-fonoti-and-nz-pm3jb-fonoti-and-nz-pm5jb-fonoti-and-nz-pm6

fonoti-petition66fonoti-petition77

THE UNITED NATIONS APPROVAL FOR SELF-GOVERNMENT IN SAMOA ON THE 13TH DECEMBER 1946. A RESULT FROM THE PETITION IN 1944 BY HON FONOTI TO HON MR FRASER. A COPY FROM THE UNITED NATIONS AS PER REQUESTED.

united-nations-approval0

united-nations-approval1united-nations-approval2

united-nations-approval4

HON FONOTI MATA’UTIA IOANE BROWN THE LEADER OF FONO OF FAIPULE OF SAMOA 1939 TO 1947.

jb-fonoti-leader-of-fono-of-faipule-letter-in-1945HON FONOTI MATA’UTIA IOANE BROWN OF LALOVAEA AND LOTOFAGA ATUA 1901-74. HES A DESCENDANT OF KING FONOTI TUPU TAFA’IFA OF SAMOA. PICTURED IN 1955.

HON FONOTI MATA'UTIA JOHN BROWN

SAMOA’S FREEDOM FROM THE NEW ZEALAND GOVERNMENT AND THE BRITISH EMPEROR ISSUED AND CONFIRMED! – WESTERN SAMOA’S INDEPENDENCE.

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Click link for more on J.B. Fonoti leadership copies Fono of Faipule proceedings: FonoFaipule

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